This content was published: November 22, 2016. Phone numbers, email addresses, and other information may have changed.

Discovering culture and history through Arabic conversation

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Instructor Afaf Raad Azar has been teaching Modern Standard Arabic for three years, and believes that Arabic Language is a mirror that reflects a great culture, and an image of a great civilization. She loves not only teaching the language but also sharing the Arabic culture with her students.

  • Students in class

About Justin Eslinger

Justin is the Graphic Designer for PCC Continuing Education. His responsibilities include designing departmental promotions, student support and customer relations. Justin has an Associates of Applied Science in Graphic Design from Portland... more »

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Comments

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x by Dawn Salois 1 year ago

I would be so nice have some information on local Muslim and Middle Eastern migration history. I had to do a capstone at PSU and even the Coalition of Communities of Color has NO information on the subject. We had Ateiyeh the rug merchant family since the turn of the 20th century in the area. There were Lebanese, I think they may have been Christian, but I Dont Know and cant really find information. We have a large Sikh community, no not strictly Muslim, but what of those from India and Pakistan? What about the Iranian migration of the 70s? I used to work at Portland Center Apartments in the late 70s, early 80s. PSU had a special program where they would teach English language and give a 4 year degree in 6 years–many student from Saudi and Qatar lived in the Portland Center Apartments. I know, I cleaned the apartments in 1979. Show Us the Local History! thank you, Dawn Salois

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