Portland Community College | Portland, Oregon Portland Community College

Video Art / Digital Art

PCC Art Galleries

An interactive three-dimensional realm where a user can float around the environment and collide with objects, triggering different sounds; the landscape is very surreal made of plastic looking mountain scapes, floating abstract shapes, a floating pyramid and a giant rotating hand.

Veronica Avola, “When It Reigns”, 2020, hand drawings, Unity, Blender, Maya, Photoshop and html, 10 minutes. In this composition, I brought together hand drawings, self-made 3-D models, sounds I generated, and creative coding to create an interactive experience. I wanted to make the experience highly immersive and interactive both by letting the user move around inside the realm, and by being able to trigger sounds and alter the soundscape.

 

A video performance art piece in black and white.

Tom Farrenkopf, “Discordance”, 2020, video performance with self, 5:20 minutes, 1080 px x 1920 px. Originally designed to be a performance art project, this project changed to video format due to the pandemic.

 

A blurry image of a neon pink flower as it hangs almost in the center of the frame, surrounded by leaves. The text in the middle of the screen reads: “and we found each other again / reunited, in this corporeal form.” The timestamp on the video says that it was taken March 05th, 2021 at 9:51am.

Will Holt, “4/the beginning”, 2021, iPhone camera, Beastgrip stabilizing rig, Adobe Premiere, iPad app Filmmaker Pro, iPhone app Filmic Pro, 4:14 minutes. “4/the beginning” is my initial foray into video art. Heavily inspired by artists like Nam June Paik & Pipilotti Rist after being introduced to them in ART 103: Understanding New Media Arts, I produced “4/the beginning” as my final project. The piece is divided into 4 sections, each with their own poem. The final lines of each poem appear on screen, available to be considered before they are recited in the accompanying audio. An instrumental ambient track pairs with the poem’s recitation, as images shot in the style of a VHS camcorder flicker on and off screen. 

 

Hazel is made in a diamond shape from the front view with pink hair, small yogurt cups hanging all over the body, and many bright colors of material throughout.

Sharon Lee Wagner, “Hazel”, 2020, cardboard mesh, yarn, plastic yogurt containers, woven scarves, yellow t-shirt, pom poms, crayons, foam pipe insulation, string, shells, pool noodles, 4.5′ x 1.5′ x approx. 1′ (variable). Hazel is a light, playful, colorful, and kinetic wearable sculpture made from scrap materials from home, cardboard mesh from a car battery divider, and scarves from the Goodwill outlet. Playing with the mesh led me to make it into a cylinder. I loved the curve in the yogurt containers and made sure to keep that quality visible in the sculpture. Next I added color and more texture. For the video I wore black and tied some of the main yarn around my wrists and ankles to complete the look. Playground kids loved watching and were not the least bit scared.

A female figure masking her face with a bull's skull, while standing in an abstract field of billowing pinwheels, all in black and white, save for one pinwheel.

Stu Guidry, “Sentinel Gardens”, 2020, digital collage. This was for a collage assignment. I wanted to avoid the clutter one can easily stray into with collage, so I restricted myself to just two elements. I’ve always had an admiration for artists from the op art movement like Bridget Riley and Victor Vasarely, and it tends to come out in my collage work.

 

A wide, eye-level view of an old and crumbling castle surrounded by wooden walls. It's surrounded by overgrowth, with a dead tree in the foreground. The colors are muted.

Stu Guidry, “Roadside Attraction”, 2020, digital painting. Occasionally for assignments I try to do something illustrative that could also serve as concept art for my personal projects. In this case I needed a decrepit motte and bailey castle surrounded by swamp lands. I kept the colors somewhat subdued to maintain an air of quiet mystique.

 

A close up photograph of a leaf with water droplets on it, colorful lines and shapes are added to it, with small animals such as lizards and bugs drawn in the foreground of the image.

Cody Popish, “Microbiome”, 2020, digital illustration on photograph. This image is part of a three-part series of images that I have photographed and drawn over for a photography class project. While I was in a photography class, my roots are in illustration, and so I wanted to explore these two mediums combined in my own personal style. This image represents an ecosystem at a smaller scale, and the diversity of species that we possibility haven’t even discovered yet.

 

A close up photograph of blades of grass, very bright sunlight in the background, colorful lines and shapes in foreground, and a ladybug and a crow drawn in the foreground.

Cody Popish, “Mr. Blue Sky”, 2020, digital illustration on photograph. This image is part of a three-part series of images that I have photographed and drawn over for a photography class project. While I was in a photography class, my roots are in illustration, and so I wanted to explore these two mediums combined in my own personal style. This image is meant to show how one can find beauty and inspiration from even the simplest of things.

 

A photograph of a cement wall with colorful illustrations drawn on it, two cartoon cats are in the foreground, twisting vines and plant life alongside graffiti are in the background.

Cody Popish, “New Earth”, digital illustration on photograph. This image is part of a three-part series of images that I have photographed and drawn over for a photography class project. While I was in a photography class, my roots are in illustration, and so I wanted to explore these two mediums combined in my own personal style. This image explores the overgrowth of nature in abandoned manmade spaces, and how it oftentimes makes a place look magical.