Students enjoy Holi festival with battle of colors at Cascade Campus

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holiThe Cascade Campus student leadership as well as other campuses throughout the week have been getting a taste of the Hindu religious festival — Holi. It is known as the “festival of colors” and is a spring festival celebrated all across India and Nepal and among Hindus in Bangladesh and Pakistan. On Monday, March 5, Cascade students enjoyed Indian food, watched Bollywood dancing and then donned white shirts that soon were stained by raining color — all in the spirit of furthering their cultural understanding.

Holi is an ancient Hindu religious festival which has become popular with non-Hindus in many parts of South Asia, as well as people of other communities outside Asia.

Holi is an ancient Hindu religious festival which has become popular with non-Hindus in many parts of South Asia, as well as people of other communities outside Asia.

People visit family, friends and foes to throw colored powders on each other, laugh and gossip, then share Holi delicacies, food and drinks.

People visit family, friends and foes to throw colored powders on each other, laugh and gossip, then share Holi delicacies, food and drinks.

It is a national holiday in India and Nepal with regional holidays in other countries.

It is a national holiday in India and Nepal with regional holidays in other countries.

Traditionally, washable natural plant-derived colors such as turmeric, neem, dhak, and kumkum were used, but water-based commercial pigments are increasingly used.

Traditionally, washable natural plant-derived colors such as turmeric, neem, dhak, and kumkum were used, but water-based commercial pigments are increasingly used.

The playful throwing of natural colored powders has a medicinal significance: using medicinal herbs prescribed by Āyurvedic doctors in the dyes.

The playful throwing of natural colored powders has a medicinal significance: using medicinal herbs prescribed by Āyurvedic doctors in the dyes.

After a day of play with colors, people clean and dress up in the evening, and greet friends and relatives by visiting them and exchanging sweets.

After a day of play with colors, people clean and dress up in the evening, and greet friends and relatives by visiting them and exchanging sweets.

 

 

About James Hill

James G. Hill, an award-winning journalist and public relations writer, has been the Communications Specialist for the Office of Public Affairs at Portland Community College since November of 1999. A graduate of Portland State University, J... more »

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Comments

There are 4 comment for this article. If you see something that doesn't belong, please click the x and report it.

x by Jonita 7 months ago

What a cool thing for student leaders to coordinate and celebrate! I’m so proud of yall. That’s awesome.

x by Phillip Hammil 7 months ago

This is awesome! Great pictures!

x by PATRICIA LARUE 7 months ago

Why does the Hindu Festival of Colors become the “battle of colors” in this piece? If we want our society, and especially our schools, to became less violent, it starts with becoming more aware of the warrior mentality embedded in our language and culture, and making more thoughtful word choices. It is especially important for journalists – at all levels – to be mindful of this largely unconscious bias. Certainly life and society are full of conflicts – but relatively few of them are violent and merit terms like battle, fight, war. There is no need to “fight cancer,” for example. We need to cure it, and ourselves.

x by Kim 7 months ago

This wasn’t a “Battle” or “fight.” I participated in this. It was fun just tossing color around and helping others get colorful. People were laughing, having a good time. When the color had settled, we took group pics. Some of us even rolled in some of the color to get more color ^^ There wasn’t anything violent or warrior like in this event.

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