Equity and Diversity Advocates Program

The Equity and Diversity Advocates are a group of culturally responsive student leaders dedicated to empowering PCC students and serving their community. These students help further the Multicultural Center’s mission by coordinating campus and community events, staffing the Center, as well as serving as advocates for students.

Requirements

  • 2.75 GPA
  • Currently enrolled in 8 credits at PCC
  • 6 credit hours taken at Cascade Campus
  • Ability to work collaboratively with the public from diverse groups in a variety of settings
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a team

What does the Multicultural Center do?

Through a combination of trainings, workshops, and retreats you will develop the leadership skills necessary to effectively combat the structural inequities facing students of color. The knowledge you gain will be used to develop programs, events, volunteer opportunities and resources that support students of color, educate the PCC community and promote institutional change.

Profiles

Brian Izquierdo Burgos
Bryan Izquierdo Burgos

 

About me:

I was born in Guayaquil, Ecuador, and in 2007 my siblings and I immigrated to the United States. Since I arrived to the United States, Oregon has been the only state I lived in. Even though I’ve spent a long time in America, I am still influenced by my Ecuadorian culture.

I like listening to Bachata, Salsa, Vallenatos, specially dancing whenever my jam comes on. There are times I make Ecuadorian dishes at home which has helped me learn to cook.

One of my dreams is to become a nurse. Hopefully I can transfer to OHSU and graduate with a BSN. One day I want to go back to Ecuador and teach people in the rural area first aid, and ways to help the sick.

Why you decided to work in the Multicultural Center:
I’ve always been curious about social justice issues. By far it has been a learning experience with challenges on changing the way I used to think.

Fun fact:
I enjoy drawing, I always take my time because I tend to be a perfectionist. I’m also learning to play the guitar, but flamenco style. I always found flamenco to be artistic because of the skills required to play it.

John McLemore
John McLemore

 

About me:

I was born in Clarksville Tennessee. I was adopted when I was four years old. I moved to Nashville after I got adopted. I lived there for about eight years. After 7th grade I moved to Pennsylvania to live with my grandparents. I stayed there for two years. Once I finished freshman year in highschool my mama and I moved to Vermont. I finished high school there and took a gap year. After my gap year I moved to live with my dad and stepmom in Richmond, Virginia. We stayed there for a little over a month and moved here to Portland in May 2016.

Why you decided to work in the Multicultural Center:

I decided to work in the Multicultural Center because I was around last year and seeing the work the last EDA did and I wanted to get involved. I like being in a leadership role and being able to help make a change within PCC life and just life in general.

Fun fact:

I am a big sports fan. I mostly follow pro/college basketball, pro/college football, and soccer. My favorite teams are the Philadelphia Eagles, Alabama Crimson Tide, Boston Celtics, North Carolina Tarheels, and for soccer its Chelsea and Borussia Dortmund.

Drea VanDerRest
Drea VanDerRest

 

About me:

Hi I’m Drea Genoveva  I was born in Torrance, Ca. Raised in Portland OR.

In school i was usually one of the shyest students. Speaking up is something I’ve struggled with in school for many years. I was afraid that if I spoke up everyone would realize how different I was from them and not accept me. It took a lot of growing up, and life experience to realize I didn’t need to feel that way. I got my GED when I was 16 and took some college classes in the old version of this campus. After a couple terms I ended up seeking work instead of school. Though I gained a lot of learning experiences from the jobs I worked, I realized that Education would help strengthen me through the work process even more. I really enjoy serving people through the work I do, but I’m ready to make a bigger impact than keeping a cup of coffee warm. Not to say that keeping a cup of coffee warm is lesser than getting an education, some people with degrees choose to serve coffee instead. I’ve been there, and I’m ready to try something new! and hey, it may involve coffee still, we’ll see. Or will we? Now that i’m back and giving school a new shot and approach, I’m really excited for all the resources and opportunities that have become available to me and yours! School is high up on my list of priorities right now, so I‘m really glad to be here and be given this amazing opportunity.

Why you decided to work in the Multicultural Center:
When I was first exposed to the Multicultural Center at PCC, I felt a strange new hope within, as if this was a major opportunity not only for my academic growth, but for my own personal growth. I also saw this job as an opportunity to gain new communication skills and become aware of who I am in society and how to better navigate my options in life. I love the amount of energy that comes in and out of the center, some days it’s a quiet and studious energy, other times there’s a bunch of students here who came to study, but also to socialize, crack jokes and listen to music, it’s pretty good stuff…most of the time, and you better believe it’s DIVERSE. This is the environment I’ve been longing for, living in a predominately white cultured city.

Fun fact:
I currently work part time at a comic book store, where I get to small talk (sometimes it gets real) with some of the best comic book writers in the industry! Many of them happen to Iive in Portland!