Portland Community College | Portland, Oregon Portland Community College

Course Content and Outcomes Guide for CH 222 Effective Fall 2021

Course Number:
CH 222
Course Title:
General Chemistry II
Credit Hours:
5
Lecture Hours:
40
Lecture/Lab Hours:
0
Lab Hours:
30
Special Fee:
$12.00

Course Description

Explores stoichiometry; chemical reactions and equations; thermo chemistry; physical states of matter including properties of gases, liquids, solids and solutions; and chemical kinetics. Introduces organic chemistry. This is the second course in a three course sequence. Prerequisites: CH 221 or CH 221H. Audit available.

Addendum to Course Description

Chemistry 222 is the second of a three terms, 15-credit hour (5 hours/term), chemistry sequence designed to provide a year of general chemistry to science majors. It will meet transfer school requirements for such science majors as: chemistry, physics, chemical engineering, pre-medicine, and other pre-professional programs. The class consists of lecture, and laboratory. The lecture time is used to provide the student with basic chemical concepts and mathematical applications to chemistry.  The laboratory re-enforces concepts presented in lecture and provides the student a hands-on opportunity to explore these.

Intended Outcomes for the course

Upon completion of this course the student should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a basic ability to use effective written and/or oral communication through the application of general chemistry concepts and reasoning using the language of chemistry.
  • Demonstrate an emerging understanding of how general chemistry impacts the natural and technological environments.
  • Demonstrate a basic ability to use detailed data collection, analysis and collaborative skills in order to explore general chemical principles, critically evaluate models and information, draw conclusions and communicate results in the context of the material covered in General Chemistry II.  
  • Demonstrate an emerging understanding of chemical principles and collaborative skills to effectively solve problems encountered in general chemistry using appropriate computational and reasoning skills.

Quantitative Reasoning

Students completing an associate degree at Portland Community College will be able to analyze questions or problems that impact the community and/or environment using quantitative information.

Aspirational Goals

Core Outcome 4: Cultural Awareness

Demonstrate appropriate cultural awareness within the general chemistry field.

Core Outcome 6:  Self Reflection

Demonstrate effective self-reflective skills within the general chemistry field.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

PCC Core Outcome Mapping: Core Outcome Communication - Mapping Level Indicator 2

Demonstrate a basic ability to use effective written and/or oral communication through the application of chemical concepts and reasoning using the language of chemistry.

PCC Core Outcome Mapping: Core Outcome Community and Environmental Responsibility - Mapping Level Indicator 1

Demonstrate limited understanding of how chemistry impacts the natural and technological environments.

PCC Core Outcome Mapping: Core Outcome Critical Thinking and Problem Solving - Mapping Level Indicator 2

Demonstrate a basic ability to use detailed data collection, analysis and collaborative skills in order to explore general chemical principles, critically evaluate models and information, draw conclusions and communicate results.  

PCC Core Outcome Mapping: Core Outcome Professional Competency - Mapping Level Indicator 1

Demonstrate limited understanding of chemical principles and collaborative skills to effectively solve problems encountered in general chemistry using appropriate computational and reasoning skills.

General

At the beginning of the course, the instructor will detail the methods used to evaluate student progress and the criteria for assigning a course grade. The assessment methods may include one or more of the following: examinations, quizzes, homework assignments, laboratory write-ups, research papers, small group problem solving," oral presentations or maintenance of a personal lab notebook.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

CH222 Course Specific Objectives

The following objectives will be demonstrated by the student on written assignments or assessments in  lab or lecture.

Stoichiometry

Given a balanced chemical equation, the mass of one reactant, and the stipulation that the other reactants are present in excess, calculate the maximum mass of products that can be formed.  (Benchmark 85%)

Given a balanced chemical equation and masses of multiple reactants, determine the limiting reagent, calculate the maximum mass of products that can be formed, and calculate the mass of excess reactant that remains.  (Benchmark 85%)

Given a balanced chemical equation, the mass of one reactant, the stipulation that the other reactants are present in excess, and an actual yield, calculate the theoretical yield and percent yield.  (Benchmark 85%)

Molarity and Solution Stoichiometry

Given two of the following (the mass of solute,  volume of solution, and molarity), calculate the third.  (Benchmark 85%)

Use solution stoichiometry to calculate the amounts of reactants and products for a given chemical equation (aqueous/solid, aqueous/aqueous, and aqueous/gas).  (Benchmark 85%)

Thermochemistry

Given any three of the four following data (specific heat capacity, mass, temperature change or heat), calculate the fourth.  (Benchmark 85%)

Given the melting point, boiling point, enthalpy changes associated with phase changes, and specific heats of the respective phases, calculate the heat needed to warm or cool a material from one temperature to another through a phase change.  (Benchmark 85%)

Given a balanced chemical equation and the enthalpy change associated with that equation, calculate the heat consumed or evolved when a certain mass of one of the reactants completely reacts.  (Benchmark 85%)

Write the balanced chemical equation associated with the standard enthalpy of formation for a given compound.  (Benchmark 85%)

Given a balanced chemical equation and a table of standard enthalpies of formation, bond dissociation energies,  or standard enthalpy of atom combination, calculate the standard enthalpy change associated with the reaction.  (Benchmark 85%)

Give examples of properties that are state functions.  (Benchmark 85%)

Use Hess’s law to calculate the enthalpy change of a balanced chemical equation that can be derived from a given set of balanced chemical equations and their respective enthalpy changes.  (Benchmark 85%)

Identify if a physical or chemical change is endo- or exothermic and draw a corresponding energy diagram.  (Benchmark 85%)

Categorize bond breaking and bond formation as an endo- or exothermic process.  (Benchmark 85%)

Gases

Given the ideal gas constant and any three of the four following data (volume, pressure, temperature, and amount), calculate the fourth.  (Benchmark 85%)

Given a chemical equation in which one of the products is a gas, a mass of one of the reactants, the stipulation that the other reactants are in excess, and two of the following (P, T, or V) calculate the third.  (Benchmark 85%)

Given the total pressure of a gas mixture and the mole fractions, determine the partial pressure of each gas in the mixture.  (Benchmark 85%)

Explain the relationship between any two of the four variable (n, P, V, and T) with Kinetic Molecular Theory.  (Benchmark 85%)

Explain the difference between a real and ideal gas.  (Benchmark 85%)

Intermolecular Forces

Identify the intermolecular forces present in a pure sample of a given compound.  (Benchmark 85%)

Determine if  a hydrogen bond can form between two given molecules and draw the resulting interaction.  (Benchmark 85%)

Predict the solubility of two molecular compounds based on their intermolecular forces.  (Benchmark 85%)

Discuss the origin of the following intermolecular forces  in terms of electrostatics (dipole-dipole, ion-dipole, dispersion, H-bonding, and dipole-induced dipole).  (Benchmark 85%)

Define vapor pressure and describe the effects of changing temperature, volume of the container and the amount of liquid.  (Benchmark 85%)

Given the molecular structure of several compounds, put them in increasing order of physical properties such as boiling point, melting point and vapor pressure.  (Benchmark 85%) 

Solids

Identify simple cubic, body-centered cubic, and face-centered cubic structures and state the number of atoms per unit cell.  (Benchmark 85%)

Use band theory to classify conductors, semiconductors, and insulators.  (Benchmark 85%)

Classify a solid as molecular, ionic, metallic, covalent network, or amorphous based on the structure or the physical properties.  (Benchmark 85%)  

Given the crystal structure for an element (the number of atoms in a unit cell and the relationship between unit cell edge and atom radius), calculate the density of the element. (Benchmark 85%)

Label the phases, triple point, and critical point on a blank pressure-temperature phase diagram for a pure substance.  (Benchmark 85%)

Identify the phase transitions associated with movement from one region of a blank temperature-pressure phase diagram and another.  (Benchmark 85%)

The following list of topics may be covered in CH 221, 222 or 223 depending on which campus you take the respective course at.

Solids

Use the Electron-Sea Model to explain the properties of metals such as low melting and high boiling points, mechanical properties, electrical and thermal conductivity.  (Benchmark: 85%)     

Redox Reactions

Identify the oxidation state of any element in a given formula for a compound or polyatomic ion.  (Benchmark 85%)

Given a balanced chemical equation for a redox reaction, identify the species oxidized, the species reduced, the oxidizing agent, and the reducing agent.  (Benchmark 85%)

Solutions

Rank solutions of given concentrations in order of increasing or decreasing osmotic pressure, boiling point, or vapor pressure.  (Benchmark 85%)

Given two aqueous solutions of ionic compounds, predict the solubility of the resulting products with a solubility table.  (Benchmark 85%)

Write a total and net ionic equation that describes the reaction between two aqueous compounds.  (Benchmark 85%)

Organic Chemistry

Identify at least four of the following functional groups: alcohols, amines, esters, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, alkenes, alkynes.  (Benchmark 85%)

Identify structural isomers and geometric isomers.  (Benchmark 85%)

Kinetics (Particle View)

Define the rate of a chemical reaction in terms of the rate of consumption of reactants and the rate of formation of products.  (Benchmark 85%)

Use collision theory to explain chemical reactions and their rates.  (Benchmark 85%)

Nuclear Chemistry

Identify and describe alpha, beta, gamma, and positron emission.  (Benchmark 85%)

Use changes in the values of A and Z to write and balance nuclear equations.  (Benchmark 85%)

Predict the mode of decay of a given unstable isotope.  (Benchmark 85%)

Given the rate constant or half-life for a reaction, determine the other variable.  (Benchmark 85%)

Given the half-life and initial amount of radioactive material, determine the time required for a specific amount of that substance to decay.  (Benchmark 85%)

Describe the process of fission and fusion and their differences.  (Benchmark 85%)

Describe how radioactive isotopes are used in modern medicine.  (Benchmark 85%)