CCOG for CH 102 Spring 2024


Course Number:
CH 102
Course Title:
Organic Chemistry Principles
Credit Hours:
5
Lecture Hours:
40
Lecture/Lab Hours:
0
Lab Hours:
30

Course Description

Introduces organic chemistry and biochemistry principles. Covers the properties and reactivity of functional groups such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amines, and carboxylic acids. Covers the structure and function of select classes of biomolecules such as carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. Prerequisites: (WR 115 and RD 115) or IRW 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement, and CH 100 or CH 104 or CH 151 or instructor approval. Audit available.

Addendum to Course Description

The student will receive five credits for three hours of lecture and one recitation in the classroom each week and three hours of laboratory experience each week. The student must supply his own textbook, protective eyewear and laboratory manual and problems manual if required by the instructor.

This course helps the student to develop an understanding of organic chemical principles and the applications of such principles to the Health Science field. The course is primarily designed to fulfill the chemistry requirement for the Dental Hygiene Program at Portland Community College.

Intended Outcomes for the course

Upon completion of the course students will be able to:

  • Apply qualitative and quantitative reasoning skills to solve problems related to organic chemistry in everyday life.
  • Identify bias, strengths, and weaknesses in a source of scientific information.
  • Solve problems in a collaborative environment by analyzing organic and biochemical concepts.
  • Apply fundamental terminology necessary to relate organic principles to real-world applications.
  • Solve problems using the scientific method.
  • Communicate complex scientific concepts and reasoning effectively, both orally and through formal and informal writings and reports.

Course Activities and Design

The lecture and laboratory experience combine to familiarize the student with the basic language pertaining to chemistry, fundamental principles of chemistry, and skills in basic laboratory technique. Three hours are set aside each week for lecture and three hours for laboratory. The laboratory sections are restricted to twenty-two persons.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Grades and competency will be determined according to student ability to demonstrate knowledge of specific chemistry topics and complete work by assigned deadlines; participate and complete reports of assigned laboratory experiments; and an evaluation of chemical topics assigned.


FACULTY SHALL "INSTRUCT STUDENTS, USING APPROVED COURSE CONTENT GUIDES DEVELOPED BY COLLEGE-WIDE SUBJECT AREA FACULTY." (ARTICLE 4.23, 1993-95 AGREEMENT)
At the beginning of the course, the instructor will detail the methods used to evaluate student progress and the criteria for assigning a course grade. The methods may include one or more of the following tools: examinations, quizzes, homework assignments, laboratory write-ups, research papers, small group problem solving of questions arising from application of course concepts and concerns to actual experience, oral presentations, or maintenance of a personal lab manual.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

CH 102 Course Specific Objectives

The benchmark for all objectives is 80%.

Polarity Intermolecular Forces

Given the Lewis structure of a molecule, determine whether the molecule is polar or non-polar.

Given the Lewis structure of a molecule, identify the intermolecular forces present in a pure sample of that compound.

Given the Lewis structure of two molecules, identify the intermolecular forces present in a mixture of those compounds.

Given two molecules, determine if a hydrogen bond can form, and draw the resulting interaction.

Given the molecular structure of several compounds, put them in increasing order of physical properties such as boiling point, melting point, and vapor pressure.

Alkanes and Alkenes

Given a Lewis structure or line diagram, distinguish between a straight chain and branched compound.

Given the Lewis structure of an alkane or alkene of 8 carbons or less, provide the name using IUPAC nomenclature.

Describe the relationship between hydrocarbons and daily life.

Given two molecules, distinguish whether they are constitutional/structural isomers.

Given two alkenes, determine if they they are cis- trans- or neither type isomers.

Predict the product of alkene reactions with water, hydrogen gas and halogens.

Given an alkene reaction with HX, determine the correct point of addition for the hydrogen atom in a reaction (Markovnikov addition).

Benzene and Aromatics

Given a Lewis structure or line diagram, identify an aromatic compound.

Given the Lewis structure of a simple benzene derivative or simple branched benzene, provide the name using standard IUPAC and/or ortho, meta, para notation.

Given the molecular structure of benzene, show the sigma and pi bonds and describe the resonance.

Predict that no product is formed from aromatics using reactants found in alkene reactions (no reaction).

Alcohols and Phenols

Know how to write structures for alcohols and phenols and apply IUPAC rules of nomenclature to properly name alcohols and phenols. Include applying primary, secondary and tertiary rules to classify alcohols. 

Predict structures of products from the oxidation reactions of alcohols.  Show conditions under which primary alcohols are oxidized to aldehydes then to carboxylic acids, and conditions under which secondary alcohols are oxidized to ketones. 

Recognize the factors affecting the physical properties of alcohols and phenols and rank a set of organic compounds with different functional groups by their physical properties, such as boiling point and solubility. 

Given a Lewis structure, be able to distinguish between a phenol and thiol.

Ethers

Know how to write structures for ethers and apply IUPAC rules of nomenclature to properly name ethers.

Amines

Given a acid or basic molecule, be able to identify if it is strong or weak.

Describe the difference between a strong and weak acid/base using particle level drawings.

Given a acid/base molecule, be able to write the reaction with water.

Know how to write structures for amines and apply IUPAC rules of nomenclature to properly name amines. 

Know how to classify amines as primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary. 

Discuss the effect of hydrogen bonding on the physical properties of amines and rank a set of different types of amines by their physical properties, such as boiling point and solubility. 

Be able to write chemical reactions of amines with water, predicting the products of acid-base reactions.  

Be able to describe the sources of alkaloids and relate them to daily life. 

Aldehydes and Ketones

Be able to write the structures for aldehydes and ketones, and apply IUPAC rules of nomenclature to properly name aldehydes and ketones.

Be able to describe properties such as polarity and hydrogen bonding. 

Be able to write complete reactions of aldehydes and ketones with oxidizing agents. 

Predict reactions of aldehydes and ketones with alcohols to form acetals and hemiacetals and be able to relate these structures to biochemical examples such as sucrose.

Carboxylic Acids

Given the Lewis structure of an organic molecule, be able to identify it as carboxylic acid.

Given the Lewis structure of a simple carboxylic acid, be able to name it according to standard IUPAC nomenclature or common nomenclature rules and vice-versa.

Given the Lewis structure or molecular formula of a carboxylic acid, determine if it is likely a fatty acid and explain reasoning.

Given the Lewis structure or molecular formula of a fatty acid, determine if it is saturated or unsaturated and if it is cis- or trans-.

Given an unsaturated and saturated fatty acid, explain which would have a higher melting point and why.

Show the formation of a soap from given a triglyceride and strong base (saponification.)

Describe the action of a soap or detergent.

Given the Lewis structure of a carboxylic acid, show the reaction with a given strong base.

Given the Lewis structure of a carboxylic acid and alcohol, show the formation of the resulting ester.

Esters and Amides

Draw the Lewis structure of a simple ester or amide.

Given the Lewis structure of a simple ester or amide, name each according to standard IUPAC nomenclature or common nomenclature rules and vice-versa.

Given the Lewis structure of a carboxylic acid and alcohol, show the formation of the resulting ester and be able to show the reverse reaction given an ester.

Given the Lewis structure of a carboxylic acid and amine, show the formation of the resulting amide and be able to show the reverse reaction given an amide.

Given the Lewis structure of an ester or amide, show the product of a hydration reaction.

Given the Lewis structure of an ester, show the reaction with a strong base.

Carbohydrates

Given the Lewis structure of an organic molecule, determine if it is classified as a carbohydrate.

Given the Lewis structure of a carbohydrate, classify it as an aldose, ketose, triose, tetrose, pentose, hexose, D-isomer or L-isomer (more than one choice may be appropriate).

Given a wedge-dash Lewis structure of a carbohydrate, draw a Fischer projection of the molecule.

Given the structure of an aldehyde and alcohol, show the formation of the resulting hemiacetal.

Given the structure of an aldose or ketose that is also a pentose or hexose, show the formation of the cyclical hemiacetal form of the carbohydrate.

Given the Fischer projection of a carbohydrate, draw the Haworth projection and vice-versa.

Given the Lewis structure of a carbohydrate in the beta or alpha D-form, draw the Lewis structures of the other form and the open-chain form and identify which form is more stable and the name of this process.

Given a saccharide, identify if it is a monosaccharide, disaccharide, or polysaccharide.

Given the Haworth structure of two monosaccharides and the linkage type, draw the disaccharide.

Given the Haworth structure of a disaccharide or polysaccharide, determine the type of linkages present.

Given the polysaccharide starch, glycogen, or cellulose, describe the function of each in plants or animals.

Lipids

Given the Lewis structure of a triglyceride, identify the fatty acid and glycerol backbone components.

Given the Lewis structure of a triglyceride, determine the common features shared by the fatty acids in the molecule.

Given the percentage of saturated vs. unsaturated fatty acids in a lipid sample, determine if the sample is likely from a plant or animal.

Given the Lewis structure of a triglyceride, show the product of the lipid after hydrogenation.

Given the Lewis structure or cartoon representation of a complex lipid, determine if it is a triglyceride, glycerophospholipid, sphingolipid or glycolipid.

Given the Lewis structure of a triglyceride, glycerophospholipid, sphingolipid or glycolipid, identify the functional groups, types of linkages and the polar and nonpolar regions of the molecule.

Proteins

Given a simple neutral or polar amino acid, draw a Lewis structure of the amino acid at a pH that is greater than, less than or equal to pH 7.

Given the Lewis structure of an amino acid, determine if it is classified as an acidic, basic, polar (uncharged) or nonpolar amino acid. 

Given an amino acid, draw the Lewis structure of the zwitterion.

Given the names of two or three amino acids, draw and the peptide structure and label the N- and C-termini,.

Given the Lewis structure of two amino acids, show the reaction for the formation of a peptide bond between them.

Given the cartoon of a simple protein (neutral or polar) showing the potentially charged side groups, N-terminal amino group and C-terminal carboxyl group, determine if the protein is in a solution with an acidic pH, basic pH or neutral solution.

Given diagrams of primary, secondary (alpha helix and beta sheet), tertiary or quaternary structure of a protein, label each one correctly.

Given the primary, secondary (alpha helix and beta sheet), tertiary or quaternary structure of a protein, describe the bonds and/or forces holding each structure in its state.

DNA

Given a DNA-related Lewis structure determine if it is a nucleotide, nucleoside or nitrogenous base.

Given the Lewis structure of a di- or trinucleotide, identify the various functional groups, linkages present, 5’ end and 3’ end.

Given the Lewis structure of a nucleotide, identify the phosphate, sugar and nitrogenous base portions.

Describe the base pair matching and bonding in the double helix of DNA.