PCC/ CCOG / VT

Course Content and Outcome Guide for VT 210

Course Number:
VT 210
Course Title:
Animal Nutrition
Credit Hours:
3
Lecture Hours:
30
Lecture/Lab Hours:
0
Lab Hours:
0
Special Fee:
 

Course Description

Introduces various types of nutrients, the basic principles of nutrition as applied to small and large animals, various feeding practices and their economic importance, and important nutritionally caused diseases. Covers care and handling of orphaned animals and special prescription diets. Prerequisites: VT 105, 106, 121; (BI 101 or BI 101B), BI 102; CH 100.

Addendum to Course Description

This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic fundamentals of nutrition as they apply to large and small animals, including orphans and the nutritional requirements of animals in diseased states.  
This is designed for second year veterinary technology students and is a graduation requirement for the Associates Degree in Applied Sciences in Veterinary Technology. Credits in this course are not transferable to a four year school towards a baccalaureate degree.

Intended Outcomes for the course

Upon successful completion of the course, the short term outcome will be that the student will have satisfactorily accomplished the goals and objectives of this course content and outcome guide and confirmed as provided in the assessment above. The long term outcome desired is for the student to gain sufficient skills and knowledge of animal nutrition to successfully pass the National Veterinary Technician Board Examination and effectively utilize the knowledge gained in their Cooperative Education Experience and as a practicing veterinary technician upon graduation. The course content and outcome guides are developed by college-wide subject area faculty and approved by the administration.

Course Activities and Design

This course is designed to be a lecture course. It is a three-credit-hour course that meets for three-lecture hours per week.  

Lecture topics covered are basic nutrition, feedstuffs, the nutritional requirements of small animal, and the nutritional requirements of large animals.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Grades will be based on the student€™s understanding of the course content as demonstrated by weekly quizzes, a comprehensive final examination, and by attendance. To receive a passing grade, the student must have attended a minimum of 70 percent of each of the lecture and lab classes.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

1.0   BASIC NUTRITION  
INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:
The goal is for the student to develop a comprehensive knowledge of basic nutrition. The student will become familiar with nutrient classification, function, analysis, signs of deficiency and signs of toxicity. The student will need to be able to discuss proximate analysis, systems of energy measurement and the concept of ration formulation.
2.0 FEEDSTUFFS
INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:
The goal is for the student to develop a comprehensive knowledge of feedstuffs used in animal nutrition. 
3.0 THE NUTRITIONAL NEEDS OF SMALL ANIMALS 
INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:
The goal is for the student to develop a comprehensive knowledge of the feeding of small animals and how their needs vary throughout the various stages of their life cycle in both health and disease. 
4.0 THE NUTRITIONAL NEEDS OF LARGE ANIMALS 
INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:
The goal is for the student to develop a comprehensive knowledge of the feeding of farm animals and how their needs vary throughout the various stages of their life cycle.