Portland Community College | Portland, Oregon

Course Number:
VT 210
Course Title:
Animal Nutrition
Credit Hours:
3
Lecture Hours:
30
Lecture/Lab Hours:
0
Lab Hours:
0
Special Fee:
 

Course Description

Introduces various types of nutrients, the basic principles of nutrition as applied to small and large animals, various feeding practices and their economic importance, and important nutritionally caused diseases. Covers care and handling of orphaned animals and special prescription diets. Prerequisites: Admission to Veterinary Technology program.

Addendum to Course Description

This course is designed to introduce the student to the basic fundamentals of nutrition as they apply to large and small animals, including orphans and the nutritional requirements of animals in diseased states.  

This is designed for second-year veterinary technology students and is a graduation requirement for the Associates Degree in Applied Sciences in Veterinary Technology. Credits in this course are not transferable to a four year school towards a baccalaureate degree.

Intended Outcomes for the course

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  • Understand the feeding of small and large animals and how their needs vary throughout the various stages of their life cycle in both healthy and diseased states.
  • Apply the body condition scoring method to assess the ideal weights of dogs and cats.
  • Recognize nutrients by classification, function, analysis, signs of deficiency and signs of toxicity.
  • Discuss proximate analysis, systems of energy measurement and the concept of ration formulation for small and large animals.
  • Recognize different prescription diets on the market for small animals and their basic indications for use.
  • Recognize common feed-related medical problems of horses, ruminants and swine.
  • Understand the basic nutritional requirements of laboratory animals.

Course Activities and Design

This course is designed to be a lecture course. It is a three credit-hour course that meets for three lecture-hours per week.  

Lecture topics covered include basic nutrition, feedstuffs, the nutritional requirements of small animals, and the nutritional requirements of large animals.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Grading will be based upon student understanding of the course content as demonstrated by periodic examinations, homework assignments, quizzes, a comprehensive final exam, and attendance. To be eligible for a passing grade, the student must have attended a minimum of 80 percent of each of the lecture and lab classes.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

1.0   BASIC NUTRITION

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:

The goal is for the student to develop a comprehensive knowledge of basic nutrition. The student will become familiar with nutrient classification, function, analysis, signs of deficiency and signs of toxicity. The student will need to be able to discuss proximate analysis, systems of energy measurement and the concept of ration formulation. 

OBJECTIVES:

1.1 For each of the following nutrient classes, list their sources, components, functions, signs of toxicity and signs of deficiency.

    a. Water

    b. Carbohydrates

    c. Proteins

    d. Fats

    e. Vitamins

    f. Minerals

1.2 Discuss specifically the sources, functions, analysis, signs of deficiency and signs of toxicity for each of the following:

    a. Vitamin A

    b. Vitamin D

    c. Vitamin E

    d. Vitamin K

    e. Thiamine

    f. Riboflavin

    g. Niacin

    h. Pyridoxine

    i. Cyanocobalamin

    j. Folic acid

    k. Pantothenic acid

    l. Biotin

    m. Choline

    n. Vitamin C

    o. Calcium

    p. Phosphorus

    q. Magnesium

    r. Sodium

    s. Potassium

    t. Iron

    u. Iodine

    v. Copper

    w. Zinc

    x. Selenium

1.3 Discuss feedstuff sampling and submission for nutrient analysis.

1.4 Discuss proximate analysis and the Van Soest procedure for fiber analysis.

1.5 Discuss the following measurements of energy values of a feed.

    a. Total digestible nutrients

    b. Gross energy

    c. Digestible energy

    d. Metabolizable energy

    e. Net energy

    f. Net energy maintenance

    g. Net energy production

1.6 Discuss the animal, feedstuff and nutrient parameters used in formulating rations in small and large animals. 

2.0 FEEDSTUFFS

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:

The goal is for the student to develop a comprehensive knowledge of feedstuffs used in animal nutrition.  

OBJECTIVES:

2.1 Define the following feed classifications.

    a. Roughages

    b. Concentrates

    c. Supplements

    d. Additives

2.2 Classify, describe the use and compare the following feedstuffs. Understand how processing effects their nutritional value.

    a. Corn

    b. Barley

    c. Sorghum grains

    d. Oats

    e. Wheat

    f. Rye

    g. Molasses

    h. Urea

    i. Millrun

    j. Bran

    k. Bakery wastes

    l. Alfalfa hay and pellets

    m. Clover hay

    n. Ryegrass hay

    o. Tall Fescue hay

    p. Orchard grass hay

    q. Timothy hay

    r. Kentucky bluegrass hay

    s. Pastures

    t. Silage

    u. Haylage

    v. Green chop

    w. Straw

    x. Stover

    y. Seed and animal by-product meals

3.0 THE NUTRITIONAL NEEDS OF SMALL ANIMALS

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:

The goal is for the student to develop a comprehensive knowledge of the feeding of small animals and how their needs vary throughout the various stages of their life cycle in both health and disease.  

OBJECTIVES:

3.1 List the information and ingredients on a pet food label and discuss the guaranteed analysis.

3.2 Describe the various types of pet food and how they are manufactured.

3.3 Discuss the AAFCO nutrient profiles for dog and cat foods.

3.4 Describe and calculate the caloric needs of dogs and cats for the following conditions.

    a. Maintenance

    b. Growth

    c. Pregnancy

    d. Lactation

    e. Working

    f. Cold weather

    g. Geriatric

    h. Illness

    i. Growth of giant dog breeds

    j. Orphan neonates

    k. Obesity

3.5 Discuss the water, feeding practices and non-caloric nutrient requirements in dogs and for each of the following conditions.

    a. Maintenance

    b. Growth

    c. Pregnancy

    d. Lactation

    e. Working

    f. Cold weather

    g. Geriatric

    h. Illness

    i. Growth of giant dog breeds

    j. Orphan neonates

    k. Obesity

3.6 Discuss the indications for the comparison of, the types, the palatability and the techniques of feeding of the different prescription diets on the market.    

3.7 Discuss body condition scoring and ideal weights in dogs and cats. 

3.8 Discuss nutritional needs, feeds and feeding practices for laboratory animals and birds.

3.9 Discuss the most common diets to treat nutritionally responsive diseases.

4.0 THE NUTRITIONAL NEEDS OF LARGE ANIMALS

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:

The goal is for the student to develop a comprehensive knowledge of the feeding of farm animals and how their needs vary throughout the various stages of their life cycle.

OBJECTIVES:

4.1 Discuss the feeding requirements for the following conditions in the horse.

    a. Maintenance

    b. Pregnancy

    c. Lactation

    d. Working

    e. Nursing foal

    f. Weanling

    g. Yearling

    h. Stallions

4.2 Discuss water and pasture quality as it relates to equine nutrition.

4.3 Discuss the following feed related medical problems in the horse.

    a. Colic

    b. Founder

    c. Milk fever

    d. Fescue poisoning

    e. Rye grass staggers

    f. Blister beetle toxicity

    g. Ergotism

    h. Botulism

4.5 Discuss the nutrition and feeding requirements for the following species and/or life stages of the following animals.

    a. Beef cows

    b. Calves

    c. Replacement heifers

    d. Bulls

    e. Feedlot cattle

    f. Lactating dairy cattle

    g. Dry dairy cattle

    h. Llamas

    i. Ewes

    j. lambs

    k. Rams

    l. Goats

    m. Gilts

    o. Sows

    p. Baby pigs

    q. Boars

4.6 Discuss the following feed related medical problems Ruminants.

    a. Bloat

    b. Grass Tetany

    c. Displaced abomasum

    d. Milk fever

    e. Urinary Calculi

    f. Overeating disease

4.7 Discuss the following feed related medical problems in swine.

    a. Iron deficiency anemia

    b. Lysine deficiency

    c. Nutritional secondary hyperparathyroidism