PCC/ CCOG / ENG

Course Content and Outcome Guide for ENG 105

Course Number:
ENG 105
Course Title:
Introduction to Literature (Drama)
Credit Hours:
4
Lecture Hours:
40
Lecture/Lab Hours:
0
Lab Hours:
0
Special Fee:
 

Course Description

Enhances enjoyment of plays as literature, including tragedies and comedies; increases understanding of the conventions of drama and the theater; and encourages exploration of the diversity of human experience. Prerequisites: WR 115 and RD 115 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

Intended Outcomes for the course

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

Engage, through the text, unfamiliar and diverse cultures, experiences and points of view.
Articulate ways in which the text contributes to self-understanding.
Recognize the text as a product of a particular culture and historical moment and its relationship to different art forms.
Recognize the role of form and how it influences meaning by identifying the variety of stylistic choices that authors make within given forms.
Evaluate various interpretations of a play and their validity through reading, writing and speaking, and through individual and group responses and analyze the support/evidence for a particular interpretation.
Conduct research to find materials appropriate to use for literary analysis, using MLA conventions to document primary and secondary sources in written response to a literary text.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Acknowledge the possibility of multiple interpretations of a text; Articulate various possible interpretations of a text; Recognize that not all interpretations of a text are equally valid.  Assessment tools may include responses to study questions; evaluation of small and full-group discussion; in-class and out-of-class writing exams and essays; and reviews of plays. Performance of scenes from plays may also be included as an assessment task. 

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

Themes, Concepts, and Issues:
tragedy
comedy
romance
satire
allegory
morality play
revenge tragedy
tragicomedy
comedy of manners
commedia dell'arte
myth
Aristotle's definition of tragedy
Tragic Hero
Classical Drama
Elizabethan/ Renaissance Drama
Restoration Drama
Realism
Modernism
Theater of the Absurd
postmodernism
monologue
dialogue
soliloquy
staging
stage directions
setting
scenes
acts
plot
climax
characters
protagonist
antagonist
antihero
theme
chorus
odes
prologue
epilogue
strophe/ antistrophe
choragos
blank verse
free verse
iambic pentameter
couplet
prose verse
irony
symbolism
images
conceits
diction
tone
intertexuality
structuralism/ post-structuralism
feminist criticism
Marxist criticism
new criticism/ formalism
psychoanalytic theory and criticism
Competencies and Skills:
• analysis
• writing about drama
• understanding drama through various contexts, such as social, historical, artistic convention, intertextual, playwright's vision
• critical interpretation of dramatic performance on video or live theater
• critical reading of reviews
• speaking and listening reflectively
• small-group collaboration