Minutes 11-3-2004

CURRICULUM GEN/ED COMMITTEE of the
EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY COUNCIL
MINUTES
November 3, 2004
SYLVANIA CAMPUS, CC BLDG, CONF ROOM B
3:00 - 5:00 pm

Committee Members:

X Kendra Cawley, Chair X Diane Kamali X Joe Wright X Dieterich Steinmetz
  Michael Cleghorn X Pam Kessinger X Michael Marciniak X Doris Werkman
X Marlene Eid X Dan Findley X Moe O’Connor   Jeff Josifek
X Adrian Rodriguez            

 

Committee Support:

  Amy Alday-Murray X Guy Sievert X Susan Wilson
  Frost Johnson X Brett Williams    

Guests:

Carol Bruneau, Christyn Dundorf, James Harrison, Amy Potter, Joe Urbina, Margaret Campbell-McCrea, Kal Robertson, Art Schneider, Maria Alejandra-Bonifacino, Tony Zable, Melinda Hutson.

 

The meeting began at 3:05 pm with introductions and a quick review of the following informational items.

Informational Items:

    • Experimental Course Requests
      • GER 199A – German Culture Through Film
      • PE 199B – Physical Education and Sport in Youth
      • PE 199C – Muscle Pump
      • SOC 299F – The Illumination Project II
      • SOC 299G – The Illumination Project III
      • HE 199 – Health and Human Environment
      • CG 199 – Mentorship of Returning Women Students
      • LAT 299B – Interior Plants
    • Course Inactivations
      • None this month
    OLD BUSINESS .

5. SPA 101 - SPA 101 First Year Spanish   

Title Change: SPA 101 First Year Spanish – 1st Term

RECOMMENDED

6. SPA 102 – SPA 102 First Year Spanish  

Title Change: SPA 102 First Year Spanish – 2nd Term

RECOMMENDED

7. SPA 103 – SPA 103 First Year Spanish  

Title Change: SPA 103 First Year Spanish – 3rd Term

RECOMMENDED

8. SPA 201 – Second Year Spanish  

            Second Year Spanish – 1st Term

RECOMMENDED

9. SPA 202 – Second Year Spanish  

Second Year Spanish – 2nd Term

RECOMMENDED

10. SPA 203 – Second Year Spanish  

Second Year Spanish – 3rd Term

RECOMMENDED

32. EDO 109 Public Safety Emergency Telecommunications I  

Course Title Change: Introduction to Emergency Telecommunications I

RECOMMENDED

33. EDO 109 Public Safety Emergency Telecommunications I  

            Course Number Change: ETC 103

RECOMMENDED

34. EDO 109 Public Safety Emergency Telecommunications I  

            Course Contact/Credit Change: 3 Lec, 3Credits; 4 Lec, 4 Credits

RECOMMENDED

35. EDO 111 Public Safety Emergency Telecom III  

            Course Title Change:  Emergency Telecommunications-Call Taking

RECOMMENDED

36. EDO 111 Public Safety Emergency Telecommunications III  

            Course Number Change: ETC 104

RECOMMENDED

37. EDO 111 New Emergency Telecommunications – Call Taking

            Course Contact/Credit Change: 3 Lec, 3Credits; 4 Lec, 4 Credits

RECOMMENDED

38. EDO 108 – Transcription for Telecommunicators

            Course Number Change: ETC 108

RECOMMENDED

39. EDO 108 – Transcription for Telecommunicators

            Course Contact/Credit Change: 2 LecLab, 1 Credit

          Proposed: 3 LecLab, 2 Credit

RECOMMENDED– with correction of contact hours to 4 Lec/Lab and pending receipt of new CCOG reflecting course changes relevant to increase in contact hours.

40. EDO 105 Crisis Intervention

            Course Number Change: ETC 105

RECOMMENDED

41. EDO 227 Communication Center Operations I

            Course Title Change: Communication Center Operations – Basic Skills

RECOMMENDED

42. EDO 227 Communication Center Operations I

            Course Number Change: ETC 110

RECOMMENDED

43. EDO 227 Communication Center Operations I

Course Contact/Credit Change: 1 Lec, 2 LecLab, 2 Credit;

           Proposed: 1Lec, 3 LecLab, 2.3 Load, 5 Contact; 3 Credits

RECOMMENDED– with correction of contact hours to 4 Lec/Lab and pending receipt of new CCOG reflecting course changes relevant to increase in contact hours.

44. EDO 228 Communication Center Operations II

            Course Title Change: Communication Center Operations – Advanced Skills

RECOMMENDED

45. EDO 228 Communication Center Operations – Advanced

            Course Number Change: ETC 111

RECOMMENDED

46. EDO 228 Communication Center Operations II

Course Contact/Credit Change: 1 Lec, 2 LecLab, 3 Contact, 2 Credit

          Proposed: 1 Lec, 3 LecLab, 2.3 Load, 5 Contact, 3 Credit

RECOMMENDED– with correction of contact hours to 4 Lec/Lab and pending receipt of new CCOG reflecting course changes relevant to increase in contact hours.

47. PHY 201 General Physics (CCOG – pages 21-24 of minutes)

Course Contact/Credit Change: 3 Lec, 3 Lab, 3 Lec/Lab, .342 Load, 6 Contact, 4 Credit; 4 Lec, 3 Lab, .41 Load, 7 Contact, 5 Credit

RECOMMENDED with encouragement to reconsider specifying prerequisite of Math 111C instead of corequisite of MTH 111

48. PHY 202 General Physics (CCOG – pages 25-28 of minutes)

Course Contact/Credit Change: 3 Lec, 3 Lab, 3 Lec/Lab, .342 Load, 6 Contact, 4 Credit; 4 Lec, 3 Lab, .41 Load, 7 Contact, 5 Credit

RECOMMENDED

49. PHY 203 General Physics (CCOG – pages 29-32 of minutes)Course Contact/Credit Change: 3 Lec, 3 Lab, 3 Lec/Lab, .342 Load, 6 Contact, 4 Credit; 4 Lec, 3 Lab, .41 Load, 7 Contact, 5 Credit

RECOMMENDED

50. G 200 Principles of Geology: Field Geology – Contact/Credit Change (CCOG – page 19-20 of minutes)

RECOMMENDED with the following changes/corrections:

Lec/Lab Hours: variable 2-8 hours

Title (presented at meeting): “Field Studies: (topic/location goes here)

Prerequisite or Concurrent enrollment in G201

Modify description: add “Students may repeat for credit with different sites”.

Students should to be able to take G200 multiple times, however should not be allowed to take similar courses (i.e. Columbia Gorge long version and Columbia Gorge short version).; Description should be clarified by adding “Students may repeat for credit with different sites”.

85. GEO 221 Field Geography: The Local Landscape

            Course Description Change: Update/Clarification

RECOMMENDED with new description presented at meeting:

Project-oriented inquiry into the demographic, social, economic and spatial dynamics of a local community.  Covers field research methods, preparation of base maps and cartographic presentation of results of field study.

86. SC 17 Office Skills Update

            Course Title Change: Office Skills

            Non-credit course. Not a curriculum committee issue

88. WR 60 Spelling I Course Description Change: Clarification

Set-over due to lack of representation

89. WR 65 Spelling II Course Description Change: Clarification

Set-over due to lack of representation

90. WR 80 Writing 80 Course Description Change: Clarification

Set-over due to lack of representation

91. WR 90 Writing 90 Course Description Change: Clarification

Set-over due to lack of representation

92. WR 90C Writing 115 Course Description Change: Clarification

Set-over due to lack of representation

93. WR 91Basic Grammar Course Description Change: Clarification

Set-over due to lack of representation

94. WR 92 Basic Grammar  Course Description Change: Clarification

Set-over due to lack of representation

95. WR 93 Basic Grammar Course Description Change: Clarification

Set-over due to lack of representation

96. RD 80 Reading 80 Course Description Change: Clarification

Set-over due to lack of representation

97. RD 90 Reading 90 Course Description Change: Clarification

Set-over due to lack of representation

98. RD 91A Reading 91A Course Description Change: Clarification

Set-over due to lack of representation

99. RD 95 Reading for Enjoyment Course Description Change: Clarification

Set-over due to lack of representation

100. ECE 180 Early Childhood Professional A

New Course Request

RECOMMENDED – Amy Potter will send a revised description for review by the committee and approval via e-mail.  Add “Instructor Approval Required” as a prerequisite to ESL C and delete corequisite requirement. (Revision attached pages 7-10 of minutes)

101. ECE 181 Early Childhood Professional English B

New Course Request

RECOMMENDED – Amy Potter will send a revised description for review by the committee and approval via e-mail.  Add “Instructor Approval Required” as a prerequisite to ESL C and delete corequisite requirement. (Revision attached pages 11-14 of minutes)

102. ECE 182 – Early Childhood Professional English C

New Course Request

RECOMMENDED – Amy Potter will send a revised description for review by the committee and approval via e-mail.  Add “Instructor Approval Required” as a prerequisite to ESL C and delete corequisite requirement. (Revision attached pages 15-18 of minutes)

A letter was submitted stating contact has been made and there has been collaboration from ENL SAC for ECE 180, 181 and 182.

 

NEW BUSINESS

106. ABE 0741 Adult Basic Education: Beginning Literacy

            Course Title Change: Adult Basic Education

            RECOMMENDED

107. ABE 0744 Adult Basic Education: Secondary

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

108. HE 212 Women’s Health

            Gen. Ed. List Designation

            Postponed at SAC Request

109. HE 213 Men’s Health

            Gen. Ed. List Designation

            Postponed at SAC Request

110. HE 242 Stress & Human Health

            Gen. Ed. List Designation

            Postponed at SAC Request

111. HE 251 Community & Public Health Issues

            Gen. Ed. List Designation

            Postponed at SAC Request

112. CAS 214 Beginning Cold Fusion

            Course Description Change: Recommended prerequisites

RECOMMENDED

113. CAS 111F Beginning Web Site Creation – FrontPage

            Course Description Change: Clarification; change “qualifications”

RECOMMENDED

114. CAS 111D Beginning Web Site Creation – Dreamweaver

            Course Description Change: Clarification; change “qualifications”

RECOMMENDED

115. CAS 110 Introduction to Web Graphics

            Title Change: Introduction to Web Graphics Using Fireworks

Course Description Change: Clarify course software

RECOMMENDED

116. CAS 106 Introduction to HTML

            Title Change: Introduction to X/HTML

            Course Description Change: Clarification; Change “recommendations”

RECOMMENDED

117. PE 282A Professional Activities: Aerobic Fitness

            Title Change: Professional Activities: Aerobic Group Exercise

            RECOMMENDED

118. PE180C Advanced Swimming

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

119. WLD 9940 – Pipe Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

120. WLD 9941 – Pipe Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

121. WLD 9942 – Pipe Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

123. WLD 9943 – Pipe Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

124. WLD 9950 – Oxy-Acetylene Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

125. WLD 9951 – Oxy-Acetylene Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

126. WLD 9952 – Oxy-Acetylene Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

127. WLD 9953 – Oxy-Acetylene Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

128. WLD 9960 – Sculpture Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED – pending acknowledgement by Art SAC

129. WLD 9961 – Sculpture Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED – pending acknowledgement by Art SAC

130. WLD 9962 – Sculpture Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED – pending acknowledgement by Art SAC

131. WLD 9963 – Sculpture Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED – pending acknowledgement by Art SAC

132. WLD 9970 – Fabrication Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

133. WLD 9971 – Fabrication Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

134. WLD 9972 – Fabrication Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

135. WLD 9973 – Fabrication Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

136. WLD 9980 – Certification Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

137. WLD 9981 – Certification Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

138. WLD 9982 – Certification Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

139. WLD 9983 – Certification Welding Practice

            New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED

Clarification of repeated titles and description was given.  The intent is to allow students to get updating in specific areas and to allow variable amounts of credits/contact hours to be taken by adding multiple courses (i.e. WLD 9940 + WLD 9941 = 6 credits).  This also allows financial aid and other governmental agency compatibility and acceptance. Fees were also clarified as $12 standard assessment for Lab Courses and $45 departmental surcharge for materials.

The meeting was adjourned at 5:55 p.m.

 

Corrected Course Request – ECE180 – addendum to Curriculum Minutes 11/3/04

PROPOSED COURSE NUMBER: ECE 180

PROPOSED COURSE TITLE: Early Childhood Professional English A

30 CHARACTER TITLE FOR STUDENT TRANSCRIPT: ECP English A

PROPOSED CREDIT/CONTACT HOURS

            Lecture Hours/Week: 3       

            Lab Hours/Week:                  

            Lec/Lab Hours/Week: 0      

            Load Total: 0             

            Total Weekly Contact Hrs: 3

            Total Credits: 3                                                         

REASON FOR NEW COURSE: The Hispanic Head Start program is bringing many Spanish-speaking early childhood educators into the ECE degree program.  These new students lack the English skills needed to succeed in and AA program, and existing English-language courses fail to meet their needs.  Specifically, they need study and academic skills (which ESL classes don't provide) and subject-specific and workplace English skills (which ENNL classes don't provide).  This new course focuses on these areas and include English-Spanish bilingual support.

PROPOSED COURSE DESCRIPTION: (TO BE USED IN THE ANNUAL COLLEGE CATALOG AND SCHEDULE OF CLASSES.)  Please complete this section, at this point.

  • ECP English A, the first term of a three-term sequence, introduces the academic English used in the fields of early childhood development and education. This course is intended for non-native speakers of English who are working toward an AAS degree in Early Education and Family Studies.  Instructor Approval Only. 

PROPOSED PREREQUISITE (S): Successful completion of ESL C or ECP placement test.

PROPOSED PREREQUISITE (S)/CONCURRENT:

PROPOSED COREQUISITE (S):  Concurrent enrollment in 3-credit ECE content course recommended.

PROPOSED LEARNING OUTCOMES:  

To successfully complete ECE ___ (ECP English A), students will be able to:

  • Write a clear, satisfactory short-answer response to a given question. 
  • Demonstrate ability to understand and use a core ECE vocabulary of approximately 180 words.
  • Demonstrate ability to identify grammatical structures and use them appropriately in a variety of oral and written contexts.

ARE YOU REQUESTING A COURSE AS MEETING GENERAL EDUCATION, CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND/OR TRANSFER LIST A or B?   yes    no  INDICATE WHICH FORMS(S) YOU ARE REQUESTING.

IF YES, COMPLETE FORM M AND THE NECESSARY WORKSHEET(S).  These forms are located on the Curriculum Home Page

WHERE/HOW WILL THE COURSE BE TAUGHT (Campus)(DL Modality)? Campus

IF COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT THROUGH DISTANCE LEARNING MODE COMPLETE DL FORM

ARE THERE SIMILAR COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS OR DISCIPLINES AT THIS TIME?  yes   no  

DO SIMILAR COURSES EXIST IN THE PCC CATALOG?    yes       no   

IF YES, IDENTIFY: 

HAVE YOU CONSULTED WITH PCC SAC CHAIRS FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES REGARDING POTENTIAL COURSE DUPLICATION, ENROLLMENT IMPACT OR CONTENT OVERLAP?   yes   no   DESCRIBE:  On October 16, 2003, staff, faculty  and administrators from the ECE department met with ENNL faculty (including a SAC chair) and administration at the Rock Creeck campus.  The meeting ended with the agreement that though these ECE courses share material with existing ENNL courses, they  differ significantly in pacing, content, and bilingual support.

WILL THIS COURSE BE REQUIRED, OR AN ELECTIVE?  required    elective

DOES THIS AFFECT ANY CERTIFICATE AND/OR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS?  yes   no. If “yes” explain:

INDICATE THE IMPACT, IF ANY, WHICH THIS PROPOSAL WILL HAVE ON OTHER DEPARTMENTS AND CAMPUSES OTHER THAN YOUR OWN: Students who complete the 3-term ECP English sequence will feed into the ENNL program and work through the ENNL sequence and Writing 121.  

DOES THE PROPOSAL INVOLVE INCREASED COSTS (materials, staff, equipment, space) FOR THE LIBRARY AND AUDIO-VISUAL DEPARTMENT?  yes   no. If “yes” explain:

ATTACH COMPLETED CCOG WITH THIS REQUEST.  (URL FOR CCOG FORMAT:  http://www.pcc.edu/edserv/handbook/appendix.htm):

REQUESTED IMPLEMENTATION TERM: Fall 2004

 

Course Content and Outcomes Guide – ECE180 – addendum to Curriculum Minutes 11/3/04

 Course Number: ECE 180

Course Title: Early Childhood Professional English A

Credit Hours: 3

Lecture Hours per Week: 3

Lab Hours per Week: 0

Number of Weeks: 11/12

Course Description for Publication:

ECP English A, the first term of a three-term sequence, introduces the academic English used in the fields of early childhood development and education. The course is taught in English but includes Spanish-language support.  The writing focus is at the sentence level.  Writing tasks will include running record observations and environment observations. Extensive vocabulary building; introduction and review of introductory-level English grammar, including simple and compound sentences; question formation: negation; possessives; pronouns; subject-verb agreement; the “There is” construction; the simple present and present progressive tenses. 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ESL C or ECP placement test; concurrent enrollment in 3-credit ECE content course recommended.

Intended Outcome(s) for the Course: 

To successfully complete ECE ___ (ECP English A), students will be able to:

Write a clear, satisfactory* short-answer response to a given question (explanation of "satisfactory" below. 

Demonstrate ability to understand and use a core ECE vocabulary of approximately 180 words.

Demonstrate ability to identify grammatical structures and use them appropriately in a variety of oral and written contexts.

*Explanation of “Satisfactory” Short-Answer Response:

A satisfactory short-answer response  accurately responds to the given question; uses tense appropriately and consistently; uses subject-appropriate vocabulary; demonstrates 70% grammatical accuracy; is 1 – 5 sentences in length.

Outcome Assessment Strategies:

Students will write and revise subject-specific short answers and observations throughout the term; pass a minimum of 8 vocabulary quizzes; demonstrate familiarity with grammatical constructions; pass a midterm and a final exam.

Course Content, Themes, Concepts, Issues:

  1. Grammar and Mechanics
  2. Rhetorical Skills
  3. Critical Thinking

Competencies and Skills:

A.  Grammar and Mechanics

  1. Object, subject, and possessive pronouns
  2. “There is / There are” construction
  3. The simple present and  present progressive tenses
  4. Simple and compound sentences
  5. Application of formatting, punctuation, and capitalization rules

B.  Rhetorical Skills

At least two tenses will be the focus of one or more writing assignments focusing on a writing task important in ECE.  For example, observations are typically written in present progressive or past progressive; self-evaluations are typically written in present; interviews in simple past.

C.  Critical Thinking

  1. Avoid plagiarism
  2. Distinguish between objective and subjective information
  3. Use an English-English dictionary


Corrected Course Request – ECE181 – addendum to Curriculum Minutes 11/3/04

PROPOSED COURSE NUMBER: ECE 181

PROPOSED COURSE TITLE: Early Childhood Professional English B

30 CHARACTER TITLE FOR STUDENT TRANSCRIPT: ECP English B

PROPOSED CREDIT/CONTACT HOURS

            Lecture Hours/Week: 3      

            Lab Hours/Week:                  

            Lec/Lab Hours/Week: 0     

            Load Total: 0            

            Total Weekly Contact Hrs: 3

            Total Credits: 3                                                        

REASON FOR NEW COURSE: The Hispanic Head Start program is bringing many Spanish-speaking early childhood educators into the ECE degree program.  These new students lack the English skills needed to succeed in and AA program, and existing English-language courses fail to meet their needs.  Specifically, they need study and academic skills (which ESL classes don't provide) and subject-specific and workplace English skills (which ENNL classes don't provide).  This new course focuses on these areas and include English-Spanish bilingual support.

PROPOSED COURSE DESCRIPTION: (TO BE USED IN THE ANNUAL COLLEGE CATALOG AND SCHEDULE OF CLASSES.)  Please complete this section, at this point.

ECP English B, the second term of a three-term sequence, continues an introduction to the academic English used in the fields of early childhood development and education. This course is intended for non-native speakers of English who are working toward an AAS degree in Early Education and Family Studies. Instructor Approval Only.

PROPOSED PREREQUISITE (S): Successful completion of ECP A or ECP placement test.

PROPOSED PREREQUISITE (S)/CONCURRENT:

PROPOSED COREQUISITE (S):  Concurrent enrollment in 3-credit ECE content course recommended.

PROPOSED LEARNING OUTCOMES:  To successfully complete ECE ___ (ECP English B), students will be able to:

  • Write a clear, satisfactory short answer in response to a question.
  • Write a short running observation (5 sentences minimum).
  • Demonstrate familiarity with a minimum of 3 rhetorical styles (journal; anecdotal observation; running observation; summary; self-evaluation).
  • Demonstrate ability to understand and use a core ECE vocabulary of approximately 280 words.
  • Demonstrate ability to identify grammatical structures and use them appropriately in a variety of oral and written contexts.

ARE YOU REQUESTING A COURSE AS MEETING GENERAL EDUCATION, CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND/OR TRANSFER LIST A or B?   yes    no  INDICATE WHICH FORMS(S) YOU ARE REQUESTING.

IF YES, COMPLETE FORM M AND THE NECESSARY WORKSHEET(S).  These forms are located on the Curriculum Home Page: http://www.pcc.edu/edserv/curricul.htm

WHERE/HOW WILL THE COURSE BE TAUGHT (Campus)(DL Modality)? Campus

IF COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT THROUGH DISTANCE LEARNING MODE COMPLETE DL FORM

ARE THERE SIMILAR COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS OR DISCIPLINES AT THIS TIME?  yes   no  

DO SIMILAR COURSES EXIST IN THE PCC CATALOG?    yes       no   

IF YES, IDENTIFY: 

HAVE YOU CONSULTED WITH PCC SAC CHAIRS FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES REGARDING POTENTIAL COURSE DUPLICATION, ENROLLMENT IMPACT OR CONTENT OVERLAP?   yes   no   DESCRIBE:  On October 16, 2003, staff, faculty  and administrators from the ECE department met with ENNL faculty (including a SAC chair) and administration at the Rock Creeck campus.  The meeting ended with the agreement that though these ECE courses share material with existing ENNL courses, they  differ significantly in pacing, content, and bilingual support.

WILL THIS COURSE BE REQUIRED, OR AN ELECTIVE?  required    elective

DOES THIS AFFECT ANY CERTIFICATE AND/OR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS?  yes   no. If “yes” explain:

INDICATE THE IMPACT, IF ANY, WHICH THIS PROPOSAL WILL HAVE ON OTHER DEPARTMENTS AND CAMPUSES OTHER THAN YOUR OWN: Students who complete the 3-term ECP English sequence will feed into the ENNL program and work through the ENNL sequence and Writing 121.  

DOES THE PROPOSAL INVOLVE INCREASED COSTS (materials, staff, equipment, space) FOR THE LIBRARY AND AUDIO-VISUAL DEPARTMENT?  yes   no. If “yes” explain:

ATTACH COMPLETED CCOG WITH THIS REQUEST.

REQUESTED IMPLEMENTATION TERM: Winter 2004

 

Course Content and Outcomes Guide – ECE181 – addendum to Curriculum Minutes 11/3/04

 Course Number: ECE 181

Course Title: Early Childhood Professional English B

Credit Hours: 3

Lecture Hours per Week: 3

Lab Hours per Week: 0

Number of Weeks: 11/12

Course Description for Publication:

ECP English B, the second term of a three-term sequence, continues an introduction to the academic English used in the fields of early childhood development and education. The course is taught in English but includes Spanish-language support. Introduction to the writing process, including pre-writing, outlining, and college-level paper formatting.  Extensive vocabulary building; introductory-level English grammar, including complex sentences; infinitive verbs; modal verbs; nouns, including count/mass and irregular plurals; tense review; simple future and simple past tense.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ECP A or ECP placement test; concurrent enrollment in 3-credit ECE content course recommended.

Intended Outcome(s) for the Course: 

To successfully complete ECE ___ (ECP English B), students will be able to:

  • Write a clear, satisfactory* short answer in response to a question (explanation of "satisfactory" below).
  • Write a short running observation (5 sentences minimum).
  • Demonstrate familiarity with a minimum of 3 rhetorical styles (journal; anecdotal observation; running observation; summary; self-evaluation).
  • Demonstrate ability to understand and use a core ECE vocabulary of approximately 280 words.
  • Demonstrate ability to identify grammatical structures and use them appropriately in a variety of oral and written contexts.
*Explanation of “Satisfactory” Short Answer:

An satisfactory short-answer response responds accurately to the question; uses an appropriate rhetorical style; refers to source material when needed; uses tense appropriately and consistently; uses subject-appropriate vocabulary; demonstrates 70% grammatical accuracy; is typed; is a minimum of 60 words in length.

Outcome Assessment Strategies:

Students will write and revise a minimum of four out-of-class short-answer responses using a variety of rhetorical styles; pass a minimum of 8 vocabulary quizzes; demonstrate familiarity with grammatical constructions; pass a midterm and a final exam.

Course Content, Themes, Concepts, Issues:

Grammar and Mechanics

  1. Rhetorical Skills

Critical Thinking

Competencies and Skills:

A.  Grammar and Mechanics

  1. Infinitives and modals
  2. Nouns: count and mass distinction, plurals
  3. The simple future and simple past tenses
  4. Correlative conjunctions (simple and compound sentences)
  5. Application of formatting, punctuation, and capitalization rules

B.  Rhetorical Skills

  • Competently use several of the following styles: journal writing, anecdotal observation, narrative, description
  • Use indirect quotation appropriately
  • Competently translate brief Spanish-language passages

C.  Critical Thinking

  • Avoids plagiarism
  • Distinguish between descriptive and expository writing
  • Distinguish between objective and subjective information
  • Use an English-English dictionary

 

Corrected Course Request – ECE182 – addendum to Curriculum Minutes 11/3/04

PROPOSED COURSE NUMBER: ECE 182   

PROPOSED COURSE TITLE: Early Childhood Professional English C

30 CHARACTER TITLE FOR STUDENT TRANSCRIPT: ECP English C

PROPOSED CREDIT/CONTACT HOURS

            Lecture Hours/Week: 3      

            Lab Hours/Week:                  

            Lec/Lab Hours/Week: 0     

            Load Total: 0            

            Total Weekly Contact Hrs: 3

            Total Credits: 3                                                        

REASON FOR NEW COURSE: The Hispanic Head Start program is bringing many Spanish-speaking early childhood educators into the ECE degree program.  These new students lack the English skills needed to succeed in and AA program, and existing English-language courses fail to meet their needs.  Specifically, they need study and academic skills (which ESL classes don't provide) and subject-specific and workplace English skills (which ENNL classes don't provide).  This new course focuses on these areas and include English-Spanish bilingual support.

PROPOSED COURSE DESCRIPTION: (TO BE USED IN THE ANNUAL COLLEGE CATALOG AND SCHEDULE OF CLASSES.)  Please complete this section, at this point.

ECP English C, the third term of a three-term sequence, continues an introduction to the academic English used in the fields of early childhood development and education. This course is intended for non-native speakers of English who are working toward an AAS degree in Early Education and Family Studies. Instructor Approval Only.

PROPOSED PREREQUISITE (S): Successful completion of ECP A or ECP placement test.

PROPOSED PREREQUISITE (S)/CONCURRENT:

PROPOSED COREQUISITE (S):  Concurrent enrollment in 3-credit ECE content course recommended.

PROPOSED LEARNING OUTCOMES:  To successfully complete ECE ___ (ECP English C), students will be able to:

  • Write a clear, satisfactory paragraph summarizing a given reading
  • Write a satisfactory running or anecdotal observation.
  • Demonstrate ability to understand and use a core ECE vocabulary of approximately 380 words.
  • Demonstrate ability to identify grammatical structures and use them appropriately in a variety of oral and written contexts.

ARE YOU REQUESTING A COURSE AS MEETING GENERAL EDUCATION, CULTURAL DIVERSITY AND/OR TRANSFER LIST A or B?   yes    no  INDICATE WHICH FORMS(S) YOU ARE REQUESTING.

IF YES, COMPLETE FORM M AND THE NECESSARY WORKSHEET(S).  These forms are located on the Curriculum Home Page

WHERE/HOW WILL THE COURSE BE TAUGHT (Campus)(DL Modality)? Campus

IF COURSE WILL BE TAUGHT THROUGH DISTANCE LEARNING MODE COMPLETE DL FORM

ARE THERE SIMILAR COURSES IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS OR DISCIPLINES AT THIS TIME?  yes   no  

DO SIMILAR COURSES EXIST IN THE PCC CATALOG?    yes       no   

IF YES, IDENTIFY: 

HAVE YOU CONSULTED WITH PCC SAC CHAIRS FROM OTHER DISCIPLINES REGARDING POTENTIAL COURSE DUPLICATION, ENROLLMENT IMPACT OR CONTENT OVERLAP?   yes   no   DESCRIBE:  On October 16, 2003, staff, faculty  and administrators from the ECE department met with ENNL faculty (including a SAC chair) and administration at the Rock Creeck campus.  The meeting ended with the agreement that though these ECE courses share material with existing ENNL courses, they  differ significantly in pacing, content, and bilingual support.

WILL THIS COURSE BE REQUIRED, OR AN ELECTIVE?  required    elective

DOES THIS AFFECT ANY CERTIFICATE AND/OR DEGREE REQUIREMENTS?  yes   no. If “yes” explain:

INDICATE THE IMPACT, IF ANY, WHICH THIS PROPOSAL WILL HAVE ON OTHER DEPARTMENTS AND CAMPUSES OTHER THAN YOUR OWN: Students who complete the 3-term ECP English sequence will feed into the ENNL program and work through the ENNL sequence and Writing 121.

DOES THE PROPOSAL INVOLVE INCREASED COSTS (materials, staff, equipment, space) FOR THE LIBRARY AND AUDIO-VISUAL DEPARTMENT?  yes   no. If “yes” explain:

ATTACH COMPLETED CCOG WITH THIS REQUEST

REQUESTED IMPLEMENTATION TERM: Spring 2004

 

Course Content and Outcomes Guide – ECE182 – addendum to Curriculum Minutes 11/3/04

Course Number: ECE 182

Course Title: Early Childhood Professional English C

Credit Hours: 3

Lecture Hours per Week: 3

Lab Hours per Week: 0

Number of Weeks: 11/12

Course Description for Publication:

ECP English C, the third term of a three-term sequence, continues an introduction to the academic English used in the fields of early childhood development and education.  Review of the writing process, including pre-writing, outlining, and college-level paper formatting.  Extensive vocabulary building;  adjective and adverb use, including comparatives and superlatives; translation, paraphrase and summary.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of ECP B or ECP placement test; concurrent enrollment in 3-credit ECE content course recommended.

Intended Outcome(s) for the Course: 

To successfully complete ECE ___ (ECP English C), students will be able to:

  • Write a clear, satisfactory* paragraph summarizing a given reading (explanation of "satisfactory" below). 
  • Write a satisfactory running or anecdotal observation.
  • Demonstrate ability to understand and use a core ECE vocabulary of approximately 380 words.
  • Demonstrate ability to identify grammatical structures and use them appropriately in a variety of oral and written contexts.
*Explanation of “Satisfactory” Summary Paragraph:

An satisfactory summary paragraph responds accurately to the question; has an introduction and a conclusion; cites source material; uses tense appropriately and consistently; uses subject-appropriate vocabulary; demonstrates 70% grammatical accuracy; is typed and includes a header and title; is a minimum of 125 words in length.

Outcome Assessment Strategies:

Students will write and revise a minimum of five out-of-class paragraphs; write short-answer responses throughout the term;  pass a minimum of 8 vocabulary quizzes; demonstrate familiarity with grammatical constructions; pass a midterm and a final exam.

Course Content, Themes, Concepts, Issues:

  1. Grammar and Mechanics
  2. Rhetorical Skills
  3. Critical Thinking
Competencies and Skills:

A.  Grammar and Mechanics

  • Adjectives and adverbs
  • Comparatives and Superlatives
  • Auxiliary verbs
  • Application of formatting, punctuation, and capitalization rules
  • Citation of sources

B.  Rhetorical Skills

  • Competently use several of the following styles: journal writing, anecdotal observation, running observation
  • Use indirect quotation appropriately
  • Cite sources
  • Competently use paraphrase and summarize

C.  Critical Thinking

  • Avoid plagiarism
  • Distinguish between narrative, descriptive, and expository writing
  • Distinguish between objective and subjective information
  • Use an English-English dictionary

 

Course Content and Outcomes Guide – G200 – addendum to Curriculum Minutes 11/3/04

DATE:  October 26, 2004                                                          PREPARED BY:  Melinda Hutson

COURSE NUMBER:  G200

COURSE TITLE: Field Studies: (topic/location goes here)

CREDIT HOURS: 1 to 4 variable

LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK: 0

LECTURE/LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 2 to 8 variable

LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 0

NUMBER OF WEEKS:10-12

SPECIAL FEE: variable depending on site chosen and actual cost for transportation, meals, and lodging.

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION:

Introduces basic concepts in geology through field experience.  Includes both lecture and field components.  Content varies based on site location. May repeat for credit with different site.  Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment:  G201 or instructor permission.

ADDENDUM TO THE COURSE DESCRIPTION:

It is recognized by the geology/general science SAC that different field trip sites differ in complexity.  Additionally, an instructor may choose to concentrate on a few of the major processes that have shaped a particular location, rather than all of the processes (major and minor).  Thus the breadth and depth of geological knowledge attained by a student will vary depending on the chosen site and the goals of the instructor.  A student will spend 30 hours per credit in a combination of lecture/study and field observation/exercises to adequately master the outcomes and content offered by a particular site.

INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:

After completion of this course, students will:

  • understand the basic geological processes that formed the geologic site covered during the course
  • be able to use scientific field research equipment (equipment varies by site)
  • have the ability to communicate scientific concepts effectively through written  and oral reports
  • be prepared for future study in geology or related fields

COURSE ACTIVITIES AND DESIGN:

The material in this course will be presented in a classroom lecture/discussion format with an accompanying field trip.  Other educationally sound methods may be employed such as research papers and small group work.  Curriculum materials for a specified site will be approved by the geology/general sciences SAC before the site-specific course is offered.

OUTCOME ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES:

At the beginning of the course, the instructor will detail the methods used to evaluate student progress and the criteria for assigning a course grade.  The methods may include one or more of the following tools:  examinations, quizzes, homework assignments, research papers, group projects, oral presentations, or maintenance of a personal field journal.

COURSE CONTENT:

Course content varies based on location

Content common to any location includes:

  • Collaborate with peers - work effectively in groups
  • Describe the geologic history of the study area
  • Identify the rocks found in the study area
  • Discuss human impact on the study area
  • Describe the relationship between the geology and the biological organisms in the study area
  • Describe the geologic processes that are typified by the study area

 

Course Content and Outcomes Guide – PHY 201 – addendum to Curriculum Minutes 11/3/04

DATE:  October 6, 2004                                 PREPARED BY:  Tony Zable, Ph.D.

COURSE NUMBER:  PHY 201

COURSE TITLE:  General Physics

CREDIT HOURS:  5

LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK:  4

LECTURE/LAB HOURS PER WEEK:  0

LAB HOURS PER WEEK:  3

NUMBER OF WEEKS:  10-12

SPECIAL FEE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION: Study of mechanics including statics, forces and motion, energy, collisions, circular motion and rotation.  Pre-calculus introductory physics for pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-chiropractic, and pre-physical therapy degree.  Prerequisite: Corequisite is MTH 111.

ADDENDUM TO COURSE DESCRIPTION: This is a pre-calculus introductory physics course for pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-chiropractic and pre-physical therapy students and students working toward a degree.  Topic of study is mechanics, and includes statics, forces and motion, energy, collisions, circular motion and rotation.  This course meets college transfer, Oregon Block Transfer and program requirements as listed above.

COURSE ACTIVITIES AND DESIGN: Principles and techniques are presented through lectures and class demonstrations.  Students must register for lecture and one laboratory.  Laboratory work will be performed in order to clarify certain facts in the lecture material.

INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:

After completion of this course, students will

  • have an increased awareness of the physics behind phenomena observed in everyday life, including an understanding of our natural and technological environments.
  • be able to apply abstract mathematical and physical principles to specific problems such as those presented in the homework and on tests, and to reason both qualitatively and quantitatively.
  • be able to apply these same principles when confronted with similar situations in the real world, taking into account factors such as reasonable approximation and limitations due to uncertainty.
  • have strengthened mathematical skills due to the constant application of mathematics in physics.
  • be able to design experiments and acquire data with the goal of verification of physical principles.
  • have the ability to communicate experimental procedures and results clearly and effectively through a written lab report.
  • have an appreciation for the historical advancement of physics, and its relation to other disciplines.
  • be prepared for future study in pre-medicine, biology, geology, or related fields.

ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES:At the beginning of the course, the instructor will detail the methods used to evaluate student progress and the criteria for assigning a course grade.  The methods may include one or more of the following tools:  examinations, quizzes, homework assignments, laboratory reports, research papers, small group problem solving of questions arising from application of course concepts and concerns to actual experience, oral presentations, or maintenanceof a personal lab manual.Specific evaluation procedures will be given in class.  In general, grading will be based on accumulated points from homework assignments, tests, a final exam, and labs.

COURSE CONTENT

1.0 FUNDAMENTALS OF MEASUREMENT

The goal is to develop knowledge and skills in fundamentals of measurement.

Objectives:    

1.1  Demonstrate the use of the metric system.

  • units of the "SI" system
  • conversion of units
  • prefixes, from very small to very large

1.2  Use the concept of "significant figures."

  • in laboratory measurement
  • in calculations and problem solving

1.3  Use vectors in calculations

  • vectors and scalars
  • components of vectors
  • graphical solutions to vector problems
  • analytical solutions to vector problems

2.0 ACCELERATED MOTION

The goal is to gain an understanding of accelerated motion.

     2.1  Distinguish speed from velocity and solve appropriate problems involving these concepts.

     2.2  Define uniform acceleration.

     2.3  State the equations for uniformly accelerated motion and understand their derivation.  Solve problems involving these equations.

     2.4  Explain the phenomenon called "free fall" and that it is a special case of uniformly accelerated motion.

3.0 NEWTON'S LAWS

The goal is to develop knowledge and skills in the understanding and use of Newton's Laws.

Objectives:

     3.1  Explain Newton's First Law of Motion and its applications.

     3.2  Explain Newton's Third Law of Motion and to be able to apply it.

     3.3  Explain Newton's Second Law of Motion and its application.  This must include the definition of force, of weight and how it is related to mass, of inertia and how they relate to acceleration.

     3.4  Develop the ideas of Newton's Law of Gravitation, with emphasis on its being an inverse square law.

     3.5  Delineate the role of friction forces in motion problems.

4.0 WORK AND ENERGY

The goal is to develop an understanding of the relationship of work, power, and energy.

Objectives:

     4.1  Define work and solve problems involving this quantity.

     4.2  Define power and solve problems involving this quantity.

     4.3  Define energy.

     4.4  Define kinetic energy (KE) and solve problems involving this quantity.

     4.5  Explain gravitational potential energy (GPE) and solve appropriate problems.  Relate GPE and KE in specific cases, for example, a swinging pendulum.

5.0 MOMENTUM

The goal is to gain knowledge and an understanding of the concept of momentum.

Objectives:

     5.1  Explain the concept of linear momentum.

     5.2  Grasp the nature of and importance of conservation as a physical principle.  Develop the conservation of energy, of mass, of mass-energy, and especially of linear momentum.

     5.3  Restate Newton's Second Law in order to understand the phenomenon called impulse.

     5.4  Delineate elastic and inelastic collisions and use these ideas in the solution of appropriate problems.

6.0 ROTATIONAL MOTION

The goal is to develop an understanding of rotational motion.

Objectives:

     6.1  Study via analogy with linear-motion the concepts of angular distance, angular velocity, angular acceleration.

     6.2  Learn a set of angular-motion equations by analogy to the linear-motion equations previously studied.

     6.3  Discuss tangential speed, velocity and acceleration.

     6.4  Study centripetal force.

     6.5  Apply the above concepts to orbital motion.

    6.6  Develop an understanding of projectile motion and to solve appropriate problems.

7.0 MOTION OF RIGID BODIES

The goal is to gain knowledge and understanding of torque, rotational equilibrium, and angular momentum.

Objectives:

     7.1  Explain the equilibrium of a point object.

     7.2  Define torque and solve problems involving this phenomenon.

     7.3  Study the conditions for rotational equilibrium and apply this knowledge.

     7.4  Define the center of gravity.

     7.5  Study the analogy of torque and angular acceleration to force and linear acceleration.

     7.6  Develop an understanding of the conservation of angular momentum.

EACH WEEK, LABS WILL BE PERFORMED THAT CORRESPOND TO THE MATERIAL COVERED IN THE LECTURE SESSIONS.

 

Course Content and Outcomes Guide – PHY 202 – addendum to Curriculum Minutes 11/3/04

DATE:  October 6, 2004                                 PREPARED BY:  Tony Zable, Ph.D.

COURSE NUMBER:  PHY 202

COURSE TITLE:  General Physics

CREDIT HOURS:  5

LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK:  4

LECTURE/LAB HOURS PER WEEK:  0

LAB HOURS PER WEEK:  3

NUMBER OF WEEKS:  10-12

SPECIAL FEE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION: Mechanical properties of matter, heat, waves, sound and light.  Pre-calculus physics.

Prerequisite: PHY 201

ADDENDUM TO COURSE DESCRIPTION:This is a pre-calculus introductory physics course for pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-chiropractic  and pre-physical therapy students and students working toward a degree.  Study topics include mechanical properties of matter, heat, waves, sound and light.  This course meets college transfer, Oregon Block Transfer and program requirements as listed above.

COURSE ACTIVITIES AND DESIGN: Principles and techniques are presented through lectures and class demonstrations.  Students must register for lecture and one laboratory.  Laboratory work will be performed in order to clarify certain facts in the lecture materials.

INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:

After completion of this course, students will

  • have an increased awareness of the physics behind phenomena observed in everyday life, including an understanding of our natural and technological environments.
  • be able to apply abstract mathematical and physical principles to specific problems such as those presented in the homework and on tests, and to reason both qualitatively and quantitatively.
  • be able to apply these same principles when confronted with similar situations in the real world, taking into account factors such as reasonable approximation and limitations due to uncertainty.
  • have strengthened mathematical skills due to the constant application of mathematics in physics.
  • be able to design experiments and acquire data with the goal of verification of physical principles.
  • have the ability to communicate experimental procedures and results clearly and effectively through a written lab report.
  • have an appreciation for the historical advancement of physics, and its relation to other disciplines.
  • be prepared for future study in pre-medicine, biology, geology, or related fields.

ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES: At the beginning of the course, the instructor will detail the methods used to evaluate student progress and the criteria for assigning a course grade.  The methods may include one or more of the following tools:  examinations, quizzes, homework assignments, laboratory write-ups, research papers, small group problem solving of questions arising from application of course concepts and concerns to actual experience, oral presentations, or maintenance of a personal lab manual.Specific evaluation procedures will be given in class.  In general, grading will be based on accumulated points from homework assignments, tests, a final exam, and labs.

COURSE CONTENT:

1.0  MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MATTER

The goal is to develop knowledge and understanding of the mechanical properties of matter.

Objectives:

     1.1  Define the states of matter.

     1.2  Develop the following concepts and solve problems involving them:

          a.   Density and specific gravity
          b.   Hookes Law and other stress-strain laws
          c.   Pressure in liquids and gases
          d.   Archimedes principle

     1.3  Understand the principles of and the workings of a mercurial barometer.

     1.4   Study the motion of fluids by developing understanding of viscosity, Poiseville's Law, Bernoulli's Equation and Torricelli's theorem.

2.0  TEMPERATURE, MOTION AND THE GAS LAWS

The goal is to gain knowledge and skills in the understanding and use of temperature, motion, and gas laws.

Objectives:

     2.1  Understand the workings of various types of thermometers and the various temperature scales they employ.

     2.2  Develop skill in solving gas law problems.  This involves understanding the general gas law, the gas-law constant, avogadros number, etc., as well as Boyles' Law, Charles Law and Guy-Lussac's Law.

     2.3  Clarify the relationship of molecular motion to temperature.

3.0   THERMAL PROPERTIES OF MATTER

The goal is to develop knowledge of the thermal properties of matter, and skills in problem solving using these concepts.

Objectives:

     3.1  Understand heat as energy.

     3.2  Distinguish and define several heat units such as calories, kilocalories, British thermal units and to relate them to other energy units.

     3.3  Discuss the specific heats of various materials.

     3.4  Develop a knowledge of the latent heats of fusion and boiling/ evaporation and develop skills in problem solving using these concepts.

     3.5  Define calorimetry.

     3.6  Explain expansion and contraction of various materials.

     3.7  Study convection, conduction and radiation.

4.0  THERMODYNAMICS

The goal is to develop knowledge and skills in the laws of thermodynamics.

Objectives:

     4.1  State the first Law of Thermodynamics and understand its implications.

     4.2  Explain cyclic process and apply this to heat engines.

     4.3  State the Second Law of Thermodynamics and understand its implications.

     4.4  Develop an appreciation of the concepts of order, disorder and entropy.

5.0   VIBRATORY MOTION

The goal is to develop knowledge and an understanding of vibratory motion.

Objectives:

     5.1  Develop an understanding of vibrating systems such as springs.
     5.2  Study the special case known as simple harmonic motion, and relate it to sinusoidal variations.
     5.3  Solve problems involving pendulums and many other vibrating bodies.
     5.4  Consider forced vibrations.

6.0  WAVE MOTION

The goal is to develop an awareness and understanding of wave motion.

Objectives:

     6.1  Study waves on strings and other transverse waves.
     6.2  Delineate what happens when a wave motion reflects.
     6.3  Develop an understanding of resonance and standing waves, on a string for example.
     6.4  Explain longitudinal waves.
     6.5  Solve many types of problems involving wave motion.

7.0   SOUND

The goal is to gain knowledge and skills in the understanding of sound.

Objectives:

     7.1  Explain the origin, speed and intensity of sounds.
     7.2  Delineate pitch and quality of sounds.
     7.3  Learn to recognize interference of sound waves including the phenomenon of beats.
     7.4  Explain the resonance of air columns.
     7.5  Apply Doppler Effects to sound.

8.0   PROPERTIES OF LIGHT

The goal is to develop knowledge and an understanding of the properties of light.

Objectives:

     8.1  Explain light as energy.
     8.2  State the speed of light and describe how it can be measured.
     8.3  Define reflection.
     8.4  Discuss plane, concave and convex mirrors.
     8.5  Explain how images both real and virtual are formed.
     8.6  Explain refraction and how to apply Snell's Law.
     8.7  Discuss total internal reflection and apply it to fiber optics.
     8.8  Explain the thin-lens formula and how to apply it.
     8.9  Learn about combinations of lenses.

9.0  OPTICAL DEVICES

The goal is to gain knowledge and skills in the use of optical devices.

Objectives:

     9.1  Study the eye and compare it to a simple camera.
     9.2  Define diopter units.
     9.3  Explain a simple magnifier.
     9.4  Explain the operation of a microscope.
     9.5  Explain the operation of astronomical telescopes.
     9.6  Explain the operation of binoculars.
     9.7  Explain the operation of a prism spectroscope.

10.0 INTERFERENCE AND DIFFRACTION

The goal is to develop an understanding of interference and diffraction.

Objectives:

     10.1 Define diffraction and gain an understanding of its occurrences.
     10.2 Explain the Michelson Interferometer.
     10.3 Explain thin film interference.
     10.4 Explain and employ diffraction gratings.

EACH WEEK, LABS WILL BE PERFORMED THAT CORRESPOND TO THE MATERIAL COVERED IN THE LECTURE SESSION.


Course Content and Outcomes Guide – PHY 203 – addendum to Curriculum Minutes 11/3/04

DATE:  October 6, 2004                                     PREPARED BY: Tony Zable, Ph.D.

COURSE NUMBER:  PHY 203

COURSE TITLE:  General Physics

CREDIT HOURS:  5

LECTURE HOURS PER WEEK:  4

LECTURE/LAB HOURS PER WEEK: 0

LAB HOURS PER WEEK:  3

NUMBER OF WEEKS:  10-12

SPECIAL FEE:  None

COURSE DESCRIPTION FOR PUBLICATION: Electricity, magnetism and modern physics.  Pre-calculus physics. Prerequisite: PHY 202 (or PHY 201)

ADDENDUM TO COURSE DESCRIPTION:This is an pre-calculus introductory physics course for pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-chiropractic  and pre-physical therapy students and students working toward a degree.  Study topics include electricity, magnetism and modern physics.  This course meets college transfer, Oregon Block Transfer and program requirements as listed above.This is an algebra-based physics course required for students majoring in biology, pre-medicine, pre-dentistry, architecture, and many other degree programs.  The course is transferable to colleges or universities.  Students should be aware of the program requirements of the institution to which they wish to transfer.

COURSE ACTIVITIES AND DESIGN: Principles and techniques are presented through lectures and  class demonstrations.  Students must register for lecture and  one lab.  Laboratory work will be performed in order to clarify certain facts in the lecture materials.

INTENDED OUTCOMES FOR THE COURSE:

After completion of this course, students will

  • have an increased awareness of the physics behind phenomena observed in everyday life, including an understanding of our natural and technological environments.
  • be able to apply abstract mathematical and physical principles to specific problems such as those presented in the homework and on tests, and to reason both qualitatively and quantitatively.
  • be able to apply these same principles when confronted with similar situations in the real world, taking into account factors such as reasonable approximation and limitations due to uncertainty.
  • have strengthened mathematical skills due to the constant application of mathematics in physics.
  • be able to design experiments and acquire data with the goal of verification of physical principles.
  • have the ability to communicate experimental procedures and results clearly and effectively through a written lab report.
  • have an appreciation for the historical advancement of physics, and its relation to other disciplines.
  • be prepared for future study in pre-medicine, biology, geology, or related fields.

ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES: At the beginning of the course, the instructor will detail the methods used to evaluate student progress and the criteria for assigning a course grade.  The methods may include one or more of the following tools:  examinations, quizzes, homework assignments, laboratory reports, research papers, small group problem solving of questions arising from application of course concepts and concerns to actual experience, oral presentations, or maintenance of a personal lab manual.Specific evaluation procedures will be given in class.  In general, grading will be based on accumulated points from homework assignments, tests, a final exam and labs.

COURSE CONTENT:

1.0 ELECTRIC FORCES AND FIELDS

The goal is to develop knowledge and skills in the basic concepts of electric forces and fields.

Objectives:

     1.1  Study the forces between charges and apply Coulomb's Law to solve problems.
     1.2  Distinguish insulators and conductors.
     1.3  Understand charging by conduction and induction and explain the action of an electroscope to illustrate these.
     1.4  Plot electric fields about various charge configurations, thereby coming to understand the basic concept of an electric field.

2.0 ELECTRIC POTENTIAL

The goal is to develop knowledge and an understanding of what is meant by electric potential.

Objectives:

     2.1  Explain electrical potential energy and to show how it is analogous to gravitational potential energy.
     2.2  Explain the central importance of potential difference as "electrical pressure" that moves charge.
     2.3  Relate work and potential difference, and thereby understand and define the volt.
     2.4  Explain the role of batteries as energy sources and as sources of potential difference.
     2.5  Define the electron volt as an energy unit.
     2.6  Explain the operation of capacitors, including charging and discharging, dielectrics and the energy stored therein.

3.0  DIRECT CURRENT CIRCUITS

The goal is to gain knowledge and skills in the safe use of direct electrical current circuits.

Objectives:

     3.1  Discuss the concept of electric current and what is happening at the atomic level.
     3.2  Explain OHM's Law and how it operates in both simple and complex circuits.
     3.3  Explain resistivity and resistance and relate the two.
     3.4  Explain the effect of resistors in series, parallel and series-parallel circuits and solve related problems.
     3.5  Discuss the effect of capacitors in series, parallel and series-parallel circuits and solve related problems.
     3.6  State and apply Kirchhoff's Junction Rule.
     3.7  State and apply Kirchhoff's Loop Rule.
     3.8  Describe the construction and operation of galvanometers, ammeters and voltmeters.
     3.9  Describe "house" circuits and discuss electrical safety.

4.0  MAGNETISM

The goal is to gain an understanding of magnetic fields and their relationship to electrical fields.

Objectives:

     4.1  Plot magnetic fields and understand their nature by analogy to electric fields.
     4.2  Explain the magnetic fields caused by electric currents.
     4.3  Discuss the force on a current in a magnetic field and be able to calculate its magnitude and determine its direction from the Right Hand Rule.
     4.4  Explain the Hall effect.
     4.5  Diagram and explain the earth's magnetic field.
     4.6  Describe lines of flux and understand flux density.
     4.7  Define Ampere's Law.
     4.8  Compute the magnitude and direction of the magnetic fields about a current loop, a solenoid and a taroid.
     4.9  Explain the torque on a current loop in a magnetic field and how this is used in electric meters.

5.0 ELECTROMAGNETIC INDUCTION

The goal is to develop knowledge and skills in the understanding and  use of electromagnetic induction.

Objectives:

     5.1  Define induced EMFs.
     5.2  Explain mutual induction and self induction.
     5.3  Explain the characteristics of an inductance-resistance circuit.
     5.4  Explain motional EMFs.
     5.5  Describe the theory and operation of an A.C. generator and how it can be converted to a D.C.  generator.
     5.6  Describe the theory and operation of an electric motor.
     5.7  Describe the theory and operation of a transformer.

6.0 ALTERNATING CURRENTS AND ELECTRONICS

The goal is to gain knowledge and skills in the use of alternating currents and their application in electronics.

Objectives:

     6.1  Define AC quantities such as peak, effective and RMS values.
     6.2  Apply Ohm's Law to an AC resistive circuit.
     6.3  Explain the charging and discharging of capacitors and show how capacitors fit into an AC circuit.
     6.4  Explain the inductance and inductive reactance of a coil and how coils fit into AC circuits.
     6.5  Apply Ohm's law to problem solving in a combined LCR circuit.
     6.6  Explain the phenomenon of electrical resonance.
     6.7  Explain the phenomenon of thermionic emission.
     6.8  Explain the diode, the semiconductor diode and rectification.
     6.9  Discuss various electronic devices such as the x-ray machine, oscilloscope, etc.

7.0 ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES

The goal is to gain an understanding of electromagnetic waves.

Objectives:

     7.1  Explain the generation of EM waves.
     7.2  Discuss the reception of radio waves.
     7.3  Discuss the speed of EM waves.
     7.4  Diagram and explain the EM spectrum.
     7.5  Describe the ability of EM waves to transport energy.

8.0 MODERN PHYSICS

Objectives:

     8.1  Identify the circumstances, discoveries and people that launched Modern Physics.
     8.2  Enumerate and understand the postulate of relativity.
     8.3  Learn about the speed of light as a natural limit to speed.
     8.4  Explain the problem of simultaneity and calculate time changes from one frame of reference to another.
     8.5  Describe relativistic length contraction.
     8.6  Describe the relativistic mass-energy relation.
     8.7  Explain the work of Planck and Compton.
     8.8  Explain the uncertainty principle and the other features of Quantum Mechanics.

9.0 ATOMIC STRUCTURE AND THE EMISSION OF EM ENERGY

The goal is to gain an understanding of the relationship between atomic structure and electromagnetic energy.

Objectives:

     9.1  Identify the nuclear atom and the Bohr model.
     9.2  Describe the spectrum of hydrogen and to show how the Bohr model can be used to explain its emission.
     9.3  Draw energy level diagrams.
     9.4  Explain absorption of light by the Bohr model.
     9.5  Relate DeBroglies waves to the Bohr atom.
     9.6  Describe Quantum numbers and the Pauli exclusion principle.
     9.7  Explain the production of x-rays and the principle of the x-ray machine.
     9.8  Summarize our knowledge of bright line, band, absorption and continuous spectra.

10.0 THE NUCLEUS

The goal is to develop knowledge and an understanding of nuclear energy and the differences in nuclear fission and nuclear fusion.

Objectives:

     10.1 Describe the structure of atomic nuclei.
     10.2 Explain the formation of isotopes.
     10.3 Relate Mass Defect and Binding Energy.
     10.4 Explain the phenomena of radioactivity including decay products and radioactive series.
     10.5 Explain nuclear reactions and transmutations.
     10.6 Explain the nuclear force.
     10.7 Describe nuclear fission and explain how this relates to bombs and reactors.
     10.8 Describe nuclear fusion and explain how this relates to bombs and reactors.
     10.9 Explain radiation damage and radiation detection.
     10.10 Summarize the known nuclear particles including the probable Quarks.

EACH WEEK, LABS WILL BE PERFORMED THAT CORRESPOND TO THE MATERIAL COVERED IN THE LECTURE SESSION.