History Faculty

Cathy Alzner

Full-time faculty
Sylvania Campus
SS 215
cathy.alzner@pcc.edu
971-722-4093

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Shari Anderson

Part-time faculty
Cascade Campus
TH 226
seanders@pcc.edu
971-722-3102

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David Armontrout

Full-time faculty
Southeast Campus
MSH 103
darmontr@pcc.edu
971-722-6007

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Terri Barnes Terri Barnes

Full-time faculty
Rock Creek Campus
Building 3, Room 201
terri.barnes1@pcc.edu
971-722-7080

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Background

I am a native Oregonian and have lived in Portland all my life. Right after grad school I started my teaching career at PCC in the fall of 2004. Currently I primarily teach the History of Western Civilization courses and am department chair for four social science disciplines (History, Anthropology, Economics, and Political Science). Generally, you will find me in the classroom, but beginning in 2014 I will also be offering a course online as well. History is my passion, and I’m glad to have a career where I can share it with people every day.

My educational background includes an Associates of Science degree from Mt. Hood Community College, a Bachelor of Arts degree (Art History) and a Master’s degree (History) both from Portland State University. My areas of specialization were Renaissance and Baroque art history, and my fields of study in history were medieval and early modern Europe.

Research and Interests

My primary area of historical interest and research is late-medieval and early modern Europe, with particular emphasis on the history of England. As a social and cultural historian, I tend toward investigating how societies in the past functioned and how cultures developed and influenced (and were influenced by) others. I am very interested in a relatively new area of historical inquiry, microhistory, which delves much deeper into elements of everyday life, rather than focusing on grand sweeping events. My goal has always been to try and walk alongside the people of the past in an effort to understand who they were, what motivated them, and what they valued.

I am a member of the American Historical Association, the Community College Humanities Association, and the Sixteenth Century Society. I have given papers at academic conferences and have published articles on women’s monasticism in late-medieval and early modern England in Quidditas: The Journal of the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association, and also in Essex Journal in England.

Courses

  • History 100, Introduction to History*
  • History 101, Western Civilization: Ancient to Medieval*
  • History 102, Western Civilization: Medieval to Modern*
  • History 103, Western Civilization: Modern Europe*
  • History 201, History of the U.S. to 1840*
  • History 202, History of the U.S. 1840 to 1914*
  • History 203, History of the U.S. 1914 to Present*
  • History 298, Independent Study: Medieval England
  • Art History 101, Understanding Architecture
  • Art History 102, Understanding the Visual Arts
  • Art History 103, Understanding New Media Arts

*Please note that the Western Civilization and U.S. History courses do not have to be taken sequentially. Each course is separate and does not have any history prerequisites.

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Rosa Bettencourt

Part-time faculty
Sylvania Campus
SS 215
rbettenc@pcc.edu
971-722-4081

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Chris Brooks Christopher Brooks

Full-time faculty
Sylvania Campus
SS 217
christopher.brooks3@pcc.edu
971-722-4094

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Sally Davidson Parker

Part-time faculty
Newberg Center
SS 217
sally.davidson15@pcc.edu
971-722-4289

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Jeffer DaykinJeffer Daykin

Part-time faculty
Rock Creek Campus
Building 3, Room 201
jeffer.daykin15@pcc.edu
971-722-3309

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Background

Originally from New York, I’ve come to make my home in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. I was a high school social studies teacher in the Portland area and have been a history instructor at Portland Community College’s Rock Creek campus for seven years. I am passionate about both the discipline of history and the craft of teaching and continually look for ways to better meet the needs of varied learning styles in the classroom while ensuring that students develop the skills necessary for academic success.

My educational background includes both a B.A. and M.A. in History from Portland State University and a Master of Arts in Teaching from Lewis and Clark College. The primary field of study for my graduate work in history was Modern East Asia and my secondary field was World History.

Research and Interests

My primary research interests are Meiji-era (1868-1912) Japan and the international expositions held in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. I have presented at a number of conferences internationally and have recently completed research on Japan’s participation at Portland’s 1905 Lewis and Clark Centennial Exposition and the relationship of that event to the Fifth National Industrial Exposition held in Osaka, Japan in 1903. In 2011 I was the featured speaker at the Multnomah County Library's opening of Portlander Colonel Henry E. Dosch's archives.  Dosch was the Director of Exhibits for the 1905 Lewis & Clark World’s Fair.  I am currently working on a collaborative project sponsored by the Shibusawa Eiichi Foundation of Japan that examines technology transfer between Europe, the United States, Japan, and China in the Long Nineteenth Century (1850–1914).

My interest in World History has led to a diverse range of additional research areas. I have published scholarship and book reviews related to the transatlantic slave trade and in 2006 I was able to combine my passion for educational theory with my interest in East Asian history for a conference paper presented to the World History Association on the application of John Dewey’s educational philosophy in Republican-era China.

I am a member of the Association of Asian Studies Association, the Community College Humanities Association, and the World History Association. I also proudly serve on Portland Community College’s Asian Studies Committee.

Courses

  • HST 104: History of the Middle East
  • HST 105: History of India
  • HST 106: History of China
  • HST 107: History of Korea and Japan
  • HST 285: History of the Holocaust

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Mandy EllertsonMandy Ellertson

Part-time faculty
Rock Creek Campus
Building 3, Room 128
melletso@pcc.edu
971-722-7261

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Background

For over 30 years, Mandy Ellertson has worked in higher education. The last 20 have been at Portland Community College where she serves as the Student Leadership Coordinator and part time instructor in the Humanities and History division. Her work at PCC focuses on empowering students to take leadership roles on campus and in their communities. Her personal educational philosophy statement is that “we are all responsible for our own education.”

She is a member of the Coalition Against Hate Crimes (CAHC), and a volunteer for the Association of College Unions International, Portland Aquatic Club Scholarship Fund, and the Lone Fir Cemetery “Dearly Departed Tours.” Mandy currently serves on the Executive Council of the American Federation of Teachers, Local 2277 as the Academic Professionals Grievance Officer.

Mandy is the proud mother of four children who benefited from our public school system (both K12 and Higher Ed) and is happily married to Scott Ellertson, a Manager employed by the City of Portland.

Courses

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robert flynnRobert Flynn

Full-time faculty
Sylvania Campus
SS 217
robert.flynn@pcc.edu
971-722-4086

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Corbett Gottfried

Part-time faculty
Sylvania Campus
SS 215
cgottfri@pcc.edu
971-722-3247

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Sylvia Gray Sylvia Gray

Full-time faculty
Sylvania Campus
SS 215
sgray@pcc.edu
971-722-4073

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Background

While living in Italy in my twenties, I was faced numerous times with my historical ignorance. In Italy even very non-scholarly people had an idea who Julius Caesar or Machiavelli or Napoleon was, and although I had heard of some of these people, I really had no idea where they fit in the grand scheme of things! So when I returned to the states, at age 31 I took my first college class at Portland Community College: Western Civilization. A number of years later, I graduated with my Master of Arts in History from Portland State University (PSU). At PSU I focused on the western classical period (Romans and Greeks), and my minor focus was early modern European history. If you are interested in a short version of my life and how I came to teach at PCC, listen to the graduation speech I gave in June, 2012, during PCC’s 50th year celebration.

I love teaching! Western Civilization courses have been my “bread and butter” throughout the last 20+ years, but I also taught Classical History and beginning Latin at Marylhurst University for a number of years. When a need developed at PCC, I began to teach Asian history, including history of the Middle East, India, China, Japan and Korea. These courses have called on my earlier experiences of living in Japan for one year, courses in Asian history at PSU, continuing education through the East-West Center’s Asian Studies Development Program (ASDP) and focused study/travel through the CIEE.

In addition to my teaching duties, I am involved in PCC’s shared government as chair of the Educational Advisory Council, which functions both as a kind of “faculty senate” and also as overseer of degrees and certificates, curricula, academic policies and standards, and student development issues. We are a recommending body to the college president.

Recently, my book Ask the Ancients: Astonishing Advice for Daily Dilemmas has been accepted for publication in November, 2013, by a publisher who focuses on the western classics (Bolchazy-Carducci). I originally wrote this because I wanted to share with people that there are many fascinating and accessible writings in existence from 1500 or more years ago. These often address problems we still face today, yet most Americans have no idea they exist! In this book I pose a “Dear Abby” sort of current interest question, and then I answer it from a classical writer, such as Hesiod, Plato, Pausanias, Sappho, Seneca, Vitruvius, Quintilian, etc. Examples are:

  • What should I wear to a party?
  • What kind of water pipes should I use in my house?
  • How can I overcome stage fright?
  • Is suicide ever justifiable?
  • Is the world going downhill?

I have recently enrolled in a doctoral program in education at Oregon State University, focusing on community college issues. I plan to write my dissertation on some aspect of reliance on adjuncts (part-timers) at community colleges.

As for my hobbies – I love to play classical piano, and my husband and I often host house concerts. Wherever you see “Classical Beauties” listed – that’s the trio I perform with.

Courses

  • History 101 Western Civilization: Ancient to Medieval
  • History 102 Western Civilization: Medieval to Modern
  • History 103 Western Civilization: Modern Europe
  • History 105 History of India and the South Asian Region
  • History 106 History of China
  • History 107 History of Korea and Japan

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James S. HarrisonJames S. Harrison

Full-time faculty
Cascade Campus
SC 210
jharriso@pcc.edu
971-722-5215

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Background

James S. Harrison has over 40 years of experience as an educator: he has been an elementary teacher, high school teacher, a grade school principal, a college counselor and is currently a history professor.  He has worked on the Cascade Campus since 1993.

He was born in rural South Carolina, and moved to cosmopolitan New York City at age seven and came of age during the turbulent sixties. He was very active during the civil rights movement and, as a 9th grader took the initiative to picket the local Woolworth store in support of the southern sit in movement.  He was a co-founder of the Hughes High School Social Studies Weekly, which sold for 5 cents; at the end of each month the proceeds were sent to Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.   In high school he and his brother joined CORE (the Congress of Racial Equality) and participated in a variety of actions, among them: the march on city hall to protest unfair city policies, a successful sit in at Foley Square which prevented construction of a federal courthouse until minority subcontractors were hired and a voter registration drive in Harlem.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in history with a minor in geography at Hunter College.  Following graduation he became a Peace Corps Volunteer teacher at a secondary school in upcountry Sierra Leone, West Africa and travelled extensively through that part of the Continent.  While in West Africa he developed an innovative method of teaching that emphasized critical thinking as opposed to the prominent post-colonial methodology of rote learning.  Critical and creative thinking are still hallmarks of his instructive methodology.  Upon his return he earned a master’s degree from The City College of New York in the dual fields of African and 19th Century U.S. History.   While working as an academic and financial aids counselor at Lehman College he gained a perspective of individualism when it came to dealing with students.  Having lived on the east coast all of his life, he took a year off for a road trip across the country and ended up in Oregon where he worked in the Minority Career Education Program at Grant High School, which is where he met his future bride.  While serving as principal at St. Andrew’s Catholic School, he enrolled in Gonzaga University program and earned a master’s degree in curriculum and administration.  After eighteen years in the school system he was hired to teach Afro-American History on the Cascade Campus.  For four summers he taught a course in “Urban and Multicultural Education” in the Portland State University Graduate Teachers Education Program.

He considers himself a citizen of the world and fully engages in the PCC internationalization of the curriculum.  His world view was informed by his extensive travels to such countries as Spain, Sweden, Great Britain, Canada, Mexico, Venezuela, Brazil, Jamaica and Japan and he shares his global insights with his students.

In addition to teaching he served as a department chair for seventeen years and developed and pioneered several new courses in history and the humanities.  He has also served on the campus strategic planning committee, chair of both the history and humanities Subject Area Committees and on the campus Diversity Committee.  His teaching is focused on students and this is summed up in the statement: “I teach adults about life and decision making through the disciplines of history and the humanities.”

Research Interests

His main academic interests are 19th century US history, the civil rights movement, race and racism, cultural studies and social justice issues.  Historiography is an important part of his teaching and figure prominently in each of his classes.  Furthermore, he uses the PCC website in order to deliver documents and additional information to students and this is in keeping with the college’s concern about students being conversant with the digital universe.  He has also read extensively in the areas of pedagogy and the role of the community college.  He is a member of the Organization of American Historians; and has delivered presentations at a number of venues in Oregon including colleges, high schools, churches, hospitals and private businesses.

He is currently conducting research on the wartime housing project of Vanport and expects to have it ready for publication by the end of 2014.

Courses

  • HST 201 - History of the U.S. to 1840*
  • HST 202 - History of the U.S. 1840 to 1914*
  • HST 203 - History of the U.S. 1914 to Present*
  • HST 270 - History of Mexico
  • HST 274 - African American History I
  • HST 275 - African American History II
  • HST 276 - African American History III
  • HUM 204 / HST 284 - History of Africa
  • HUM 214 - Race and Racism

*Please note that the Western Civilization courses do not have to be taken sequentially. Each course is separate and does not have any history prerequisites.

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Peter Hohn

Part-time faculty
Cascade Campus
SC 211
peter.hohn@pcc.edu
971-722-3814

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Erik JohnsenErik Johnsen

Part-time faculty
Rock Creek Campus
Building 3, Room 201
erik.johnsen@gmail.com
971-722-7237

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Jason JohnsonJason Johnson

Part-time faculty
Rock Creek Campus
Building 3, Room 201
jason.johnson@pcc.edu
971-722-3559

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Background

I have been teaching History classes at Portland Community College for five years and currently teach the Western Civilization series in face-to-face and online modalities as well as a History of Science course during the Spring terms.

I graduated from The Ohio State University with a Bachelor’s degree in Engineering followed by a Master of Arts in History from Portland State University with an emphasis on the History of Science. While in graduate school I also did substantial work in economic history, the history of modern Europe, and early Soviet Union history. I love teaching at PCC and strive to convey my passion for History in all my courses.

Research and Interests

I’m currently interested in the history of ancient science with an emphasis on how the scientific perspectives and achievements of Ancient Greece and medieval Islamic civilization shaped European society prior to the Scientific Revolution. In addition, I continue to research the evolution of early Christianity and the mechanisms of religious conversions. Aspects of these topics are woven into my course offerings.

I am a member of the American Historical Association and the History of Science Society.

Courses

  • History 101, Western Civilization: Ancient to Medieval*
  • History 102, Western Civilization: Medieval to Modern*
  • History 103, Western Civilization: Modern Europe*
  • History 199S, History of Science: Ancient - 1600CE

*Please note that the Western Civilization courses do not have to be taken sequentially. Each course is separate and does not have any history prerequisites.

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Andrea Lowgren Andrea Lowgren

Full-time faculty
Rock Creek Campus
Building 3, Room 201
andrea.lowgren@pcc.edu
971-722-7259

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Background

I was born and raised in Napa, California and moved to Oregon in 1995 to do a BA in History and Music with a minor in Spanish at Linfield College followed by a MA in musicology at the University of Oregon. Afterwards, I went to Santa Cruz, California for my doctoral education. I received my PhD in History in 2007 and that fall I moved to Portland in order to teach full-time at Portland Community College.

Research and Interests

My research interests are in the histories of women, sexuality, race and urban geography.  My dissertation, “City Limits: Reputation and the Sexual Cartography of Women's Mobility in Mid-twentieth-century San Francisco” shows how for women, the politics of space was the politics of sex. My research maps the urban expressions of women's sexuality in nightclubs, red light districts, and on neighborhood streets through the categories of work, entertainment, state policing, and sexual violence. By focusing on the city of San Francisco between the 1930s and the 1960s, it navigates the topography of sexuality over a specific terrain, making it possible to draw out quotidian details of sexual life. In doing so it focuses on the concept of sexual reputation---the mid-twentieth-century version of sexual respectability. Women in San Francisco carefully managed their sexual reputations in specific class- and race-influenced ways in order to successfully market themselves in the sexual economy, find sexual enjoyment, protect their respectability, keep themselves safe from sexual violence, and avoid state authorities. Concern about reputation led to self-imposed limitations of urban mobility that combined with state regulation and sexual violence to create surprisingly resilient geographic boundaries for women. Understanding how the containment of women's mobility was built into a society's ideas about sexuality helps to explain how and why restrictions on women's movements seemed invisible and complete, providing a new lens for understanding the gendered inequality of urban spatial freedom.

My professional interests are currently focused on teaching. I orient my classes towards achieving social justice.  I think that understanding the structural relationships of power in history not only explains present-day inequities but also provides avenues for truer reconciliation.  In addition, identifying and critiquing hierarchies of privilege can hopefully direct students toward greater global consciousness and meaningful citizenship.  I also think that place-based learning can bring history alive.  And if I cannot take my students with me, I want to expand my own study in a geographically-focused manner because I think it offers an invaluable immediacy to the teaching of history.   When I tell the story of an event or of a people, I also describe the world they lived in -- the sights and sounds of their world and the effects of this environment on people’s ideologies and actions.  For this reason I love to travel.  Some of the places that I’ve visited and studied are: Haiti, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Kenya, Tanzania, Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Turkey, Bosnia, Croatia, a lot of the US and most of Europe.

Courses

  • History 201, History of the U.S. to 1840*
  • History 202, History of the U.S. 1840 to 1914*
  • History 203, History of the U.S. 1914 to Present*
  • History 225, History of Women, Sex and the Family
  • History 271, History of Central America and the Caribbean
  • Women’s Studies 101, Introduction to Women’s Studies
  • Women’s Studies 202, Women Working for Change

*Please note that the U.S. History courses do not have to be taken sequentially. Each course is separate and does not have any history prerequisites.

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Heather MayerHeather Mayer

Part-time faculty
Rock Creek Campus
Building 3, Room 201
heather.mayer1@pcc.edu
971-722-3108

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Background

I have been teaching part-time at Portland Community College since Fall of 2008. I primarily teach through Distance Learning, but enjoy the occasional on-campus class.

I was born and raised in Portland and completed my BA at Portland State University before moving to the University of California, Riverside for my MA. I am currently at PhD candidate at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia, working on my dissertation titled "Beyond the Rebel Girl: Women and the Industrial Workers of the World in Oregon and Washington, 1905-1924." I hope to be finished in Spring of 2014.

Research and Interests

My research interests focus gender and labor in the post-Civil War United States.

Courses

  • History 201, History of the U.S. to 1840*
  • History 202, History of the U.S. 1840 to 1914*
  • History 203, History of the U.S. 1914 to Present*
  • History 204, History of Women in the U.S.: Pre-colonial to 1877
  • History 205, History of Women in the U.S. 1877 to Present

*Please note that the Western Civilization and U.S. History courses do not have to be taken sequentially. Each course is separate and does not have any history prerequisites.

View the class schedule to see the courses I'm currently teaching

Jack McCluskey

Part-time faculty
Sylvania Campus
SS 215
jmcclusk@pcc.edu
971-722-3770

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James McConnellJames McConnell

Part-time faculty
Sylvania Campus
SS 217
james.mcconnell2@pcc.edu
971-722-4289

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Richard Pintarich

Part-time faculty
Southeast Campus
MSH 103
dick.pintarich@pcc.edu
971-722-6147

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Charlie Presti

Part-time faculty
Cascade Campus
SC 211
charlie.presti@pcc.edu
971-722-3103

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John Shaw John Shaw

Full-time faculty
Sylvania Campus
SS 217
john.shaw4@pcc.edu
971-722-8276

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Background

I grew up where George Washington led the Continental army across the Delaware River and surprised the Hessian garrison at Trenton, NJ on Christmas day 1776. One of my earliest childhood memories (age 3) was my parents bundling me up on Christmas morning to watch a historical reenactment (they do it every year – weather permitting). This sparked my interest and passion for history ever since.

I earned an M.A. in American Indian Studies and a Ph.D. in History from the University of Arizona. As a graduate student I discovered how much I love teaching. I believe the role of an effective teacher is to empower students. My emphasis is on facilitating the learning process and serving as a catalyst to get everyone engaged in the educational experience. As we look at history through a variety of perspectives students develop the ability to think critically. Critical thinking motivates students to make independent discoveries, develop their own ideas, values and action plans and become lifelong learners. Before coming to PCC in 2005, I was an Assistant Professor in the American Multicultural Studies department at Minnesota State University – Moorhead.

Research and Interests

My American Indian Studies concentration focused on federal Indian Law and Policy. This led to my dissertation focused on one Native community’s cultural history and its political relationship with the U.S. government: “In Order That Justice May Be Done”: The Legal Struggle of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa, 1795-1905. Every other year I travel to the National Archives in Washington, DC to do post-doctoral research. Discerning the origins of this unique Métis/Ojibwa tribe required establishing the historical context for the creation of the Native American, French and British Red River borderland (modern Minnesota, Manitoba and North Dakota) known as Rupert’s Land under the aegis of the Hudson’s Bay Company from 1670 - 1820. Their ordeal illustrates that federal Indian policy, combined with local and state politics, favored European American economic interests at the expense of tribal sovereignty and land rights, while providing a unique cross-cultural perspective on the history of European American and American Indian relations.

My current research interests involve a community study of Morristown, NJ during the American Revolution. It examines the village’s contentious relationship with the Continental army through two arduous winter encampments. I am a member of the American Historical Association and the Organization of American Historians. I have given papers at academic conferences, contributed three entries to Making it in America: A Sourcebook on Eminent Ethnic Americans (2000) and ten entries to The Encyclopedia of United States-American Indian Policy, Relations, and Law (2008), and regularly publish book reviews in UCLA’s American Indian Culture and Research Journal.

Courses

  • History 100, Introduction to History
  • History 101, Western Civilization: Ancient to Medieval
  • History 102, Western Civilization: Medieval to Modern
  • History 111, U.S. History Skills & Issues
  • History 201, History of the U.S. to 1840
  • History 202, History of the U.S. 1840 to 1914
  • History 203, History of the U.S. 1914 to Present
  • History 218, American Indian History
  • History 246, History of Religion in the U.S. to 1840

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Chris Shelley

Full-time faculty
Sylvania Campus
SS 217
christopher.shelley@pcc.edu
971-722-4428

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Carmen Thompson

Full-time faculty
Sylvania Campus
SS 215
carmen.thompson@pcc.edu
971-722-4092

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Ken Wilson

Part-time faculty
Cascade Campus
TH 226
kenneth.wilson5@pcc.edu
971-722-3465

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