Learning Objects and Media Sources

Video and Media

Accessibility and copyright must be addressed when incorporating Video and Media into any course. For more information, see Media for Your Course.

Films on Demand

Thousands of high-resolution streaming videos organized by subject. For academic research as well as general interest, this collection includes archival and newsreel films as well as career and technical videos. The Films on Demand Help Center is available for instructors.

  • How to Find materials: Go to the Films on Demand database on the PCC library website.
  • How to Link to or Embed Materials: Embedding Films on Demand videos doesn't work very well for off-campus students. Please use the Title URL to link to the video instead.
  • Copyright Concerns: None
  • Closed Captioning: Films on Demand (FOD) videos are often captioned or transcribed. If they aren't, we can request that they be captioned (takes 2 weeks). Contact Karen Sorensen or Maria Wagner to request a FOD video be captioned.
  • Academic Disciplines: Too many to list!

Intelecom

This captioned video clip (averaging 3 to 5 minutes in length) collection covers a range of key concepts and topics in various academic disciplines. Includes adult basic education (ABE) resources as well as those for English for speakers of other languages (ESOL). Now with more than 350 clips from National Geographic.

  • How to Find Videos: Go to the Intelecom Online Resources Network website. If you are accessing from off-campus, you will be directed to authenticate with your last name and G number. Select the "Academic Discipline", narrow your search by choosing a "Course" or a Topic, then select the title under "Clips".
  • How to link to or embed video: Two Ways to include video on your lessons: After you select your clip, a description of it will appear below the Search Center. Next to the description of the video, there are 4 buttons.
    1. "Embed" presents you with code to copy and paste into your html document to embed the video player in either Small (350x350) or Large size, recommended (450x450).
    2. URL presents you with a URL to paste in your course that will take students directly to the video.
  • Copyright Concerns: None - This is a subscription service for fair use. Click the Citation button (below the Embed button) to get the proper citation for the video you use.
  • Closed Captioning: Yes
  • Academic Disciplines: Vast holdings: Adult Basic Education - Allied Health - Anatomy - Business - Civic Education - Computer Science - Earth Sciences - Economics - Education - Environmental Studies - Ethnic Studies - Family and Consumer Science - Health - History - Linguistics - Math - Oceanography - Philosophy - Physics - Political Science - Psychology - Religion - Sociology - Urban Studies.

Learner.org Interactives

Go to http://learner.org/interactives to browse materials. Use the interface in the left side column to select "college" level materials- you can also sub-select by subject area.

  • How to Link to or Embed Materials:  Find the interactive module you would like to use by browsing for materials at http://learner.org/interactives, click on the title of the module, copy the resource URL and add as a web link in your D2L content outline.
  • Copyright Concerns: You are linking to an external resource, not embedding it into your course, so there are no copyright concerns. 
  • Accessibility: Many of these resources do not contain any audio and do not require captions, but some other resources that do contain audio are not captioned. In addition to captions, keep in mind that anything that requires operation or interaction from the user must be keyboard accessible. Feel free to contact Karen Sorensen to test the accessibility of any interactive learning objects you want to use in your course.
  • Academic Disciplines: Arts, Foreign Language, Literature and Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies and History.

TeacherTube

Go to the TeacherTube website and search.

  • How to Link to or Embed Materials: Below the video there is a Video URL that you can use to link to the video and an embeddable player code to paste in your course page.
  • Copyright Concerns:TeacherTube is a free and open resource that you may link to from your course.
  • Closed Captioning: Some may be, but don't count on it.
  • Academic Disciplines: Many.

Ted Talks

Go to the Ted Talks website and search.

  • How to Link to or Embed Materials: Click on the Embed button below the video. It will offer you an embed code and a link that you can use in your course.
  • Copyright Concerns: Ted is a free and open resource that you may link to from your course.
  • Closed Captioning: I believe they are all captioned/subtitled. You can specifically search for videos captioned in English or another language.
  • Academic Disciplines: Too many to list!

Annenberg Media

Our mission is to advance excellent teaching in American schools through the development and distribution of multimedia resources for teaching and learning.

  • How to Find Videos: On the Browse Teacher Resources page, select the "discipline" and "grade" level in the drop-down menus. In the results window, scroll down to view all the videos found to match your search. After selecting a title, a "VoD" icon will show for streamed videos that are free to use. These videos are longer in length than those through intelecom.
  • How to Link to or Embed Video: Only the video content is free to use. When you find a video that suits your needs, click the "VoD" icon. The video will open in a pop-up window, copy the URL at the top and paste it into your course.
  • Copyright Concerns: All Video on Demand files are protected by copyright law and are free for this streaming purpose only. Downloading, in whole or in part, is strictly prohibited. Offenders will be subject to civil and/or criminal liability under applicable laws.
  • Closed Captioning: Yes. By default CC is turned off. Hover the mouse over the video screen, then click the icon that appears in the upper right corner to turn them on.
  • Academic Disciplines: Vast holdings: Arts - Education - Education Reform - Foreign Language - Mathematics - Science - Social Studies and History.

Khan Academy

The Khan Academy is a not-for-profit organization with the goal of changing education for the better by providing a free world-class education to anyone anywhere. All of the site's resources are available to anyone. The Khan Academy also has a YouTube Channel which includes their latest offerings.

  • How to Find Materials: Visit the Khan Academy website.
  • How to Link to or Embed Materials: Link directly to the materials from Khan Academy using a quick link and the URL to your chosen video to embed it in D2L.
  • Copyright: The Khan Academy is a free and open resource that you may link to from your course.
  • Closed Captioning: Some videos are captioned.
  • Academic Disciplines: Primarily math, some science, business, and history.

Wisc Online

Wisc-Online offers an ever-growing list of high-quality educational teaching materials free to educators. This list is kept up-to-date and changes as new materials are added or existing ones are discontinued. The offerings are Learning Objects, not necessarily video.

  • How to Find Materials: Visit Wisc Online. Each academic discipline expands to include an extensive list of material options. Worth checking out if your subject area is listed below.
  • How to link to or embed materials: Copy and paste link to content.
  • Copyright Concerns: Not an issue. All materials on the Wisc-Online website are copyrighted, however educational programs are provided free for use by educators and students by linking the course materials (via copying and pasting the unique URL for each learning object) to educational Web pages.
  • Closed Captioning: The media is mostly text-based presentations and embedded video and does not have any captions.
  • Academic Disciplines: ABE/ELL - Business - General Education - Health Professional Development - Service - Technical.

Teachers’ Domain

Teachers' Domain is a free digital media service for educational use from public broadcasting and its partners. You’ll find thousands of media resources, support materials, and tools for classroom lessons, individualized learning programs, and teacher professional learning communities.

  • How to Find materials: Visit Teachers’ Domain. Each academic discipline expands to include a list of material options. Worth checking out if your subject area is listed below
  • How to Link to or Embed Materials: Copy and paste link to content.
  • Copyright Concerns: Not an issue, this is a free digital media service.
  • Closed Captioning: Most videos are captioned or have a transcript provided. Preview any objects you are interested in, to ensure they are accessible to all students.
  • Academic Disciplines: Arts – Health and Physical Education – English Language Arts – Mathematics – Science and Social Studies.

MIT Open Courseware

MIT OCW is a large-scale, Web-based electronic publishing initiative funded jointly by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and generous support of the Ab Initio software company. Its goals are to: (i) Provide free, searchable access to MIT's course materials for educators, students, and self-learners around the world, and (ii) Extend the reach and impact of MIT OCW and the "opencourseware" concept. In March 2006 there were 1,400 courses.

  • How to Find materials: Visit MIT Open Courseware. Content is listed by Department. MIT Open Courseware video can be found on the MIT YouTube Channel.
  • How to link to or embed materials: Link directly to the materials or load them in your own course shell.
  • Copyright Concerns: Use of MIT OpenCourseWare materials is open to all except for profit-making entities who charge a fee for access to educational materials. Attribution: Any and all use or reuse of the material, including use of derivative works (new materials that incorporate or draw on the original materials), must be attributed to MIT and, if a faculty member's name is associated with the material, to that person as well.
    Share alike (aka "copyleft"): Any publication or distribution of original or derivative works, including production of electronic or printed class materials or placement of materials on a Web site, must offer the works freely and openly to others under the same terms that MIT OpenCourseWare first made the works available to the user. (http://ocw.mit.edu/terms/) If you choose to reuse or repost MIT OpenCourseWare materials, you must give proper attribution to the original MIT faculty author(s). Please use the following citation format:
    • [Name], [Course Title], [Term]. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), http://ocw.mit.edu (Accessed [Date]). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
      • Example:
        • Jane Durphy, 21F.225/21F.226 Advanced Workshop in Writing for Science and Engineering (ELS), Spring 2007. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology: MIT OpenCourseWare), http://ocw.mit.edu (Accessed March 10, 2008). License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA
    • If you want to use the materials on your Web site, you must also include a copy of the MIT OpenCourseWare Creative Commons license (BY-NC-SA), or a clear and reasonable link to its URL with every copy of the MIT materials or the derivative work you create from it.
    • Please Note: MIT Open Courseware also links to other materials that are not Creative Commons licensed, but are licensed and marked as "All right reserved." For use of those materials, see the FAQ on Fair Use on the MIT Open Courseware website.
  • Closed Captioning:  Much of the content, (especially on MIT YouTube channel) is captioned.
  • Academic Disciplines: Vast holdings: Anthropology - Engineering - Mathematics - Science – Political Science - and more.

MERLOT

MERLOT is a free and open online community of resources designed primarily for faculty, staff and students of higher education from around the world to share their learning materials and pedagogy. MERLOT also has a YouTube Channel with great tutorials on how to use their site.

  • How to Find Materials: Visit MERLOT. For a New Search, type video in the first box and then select from the drop down in the second box, then search.
  • How to Link to or Embed Materials: Link directly to the materials from Merlot.
  • Copyright Concerns: MERLOT is a free and open resource designed primarily for faculty and students of higher education. MERLOT is built on the collaboration of its partners, community members, registered members, and users. Each object will have, at the bottom of it MERLOT page, information pertaining to its use.
  • Closed Captioning: Very few of these videos are captioned. Much of the MERLOT content is text-based.
  • Academic Disciplines: Vast holdings: Arts - Education - Education Reform - Foreign Language - Mathematics - Science - Social Studies and History.

Exemplary Collection of Open eLearning Content Repositories

WikiEducator has a collection of links to various repositories that may be of interest to you.