Clubs Advisors

Bldg. 3, Rm. 128 | Clubhouse: 971-722-7064 | Email: clubs.rc@pcc.edu

Thank you for becoming a club advisor at Rock Creek! Your support and leadership will help develop the academic and leadership skills that will benefit students for years to come. Each of us express leadership differently. It is important that you find a leadership voice that works for you and reaches your club members. Below you will find common roles of club advisors and some examples of advising styles and skills.

Roles

You may be asked to wear any, and sometimes all of these hats:

  • Mentor
  • Team Builder
  • Conflict Mediator
  • Educator
  • Motivator
  • Policy Interpreter

Advising Styles

Directing:
The advisor provides specific instructions and closely supervises task accomplishments. Use this style with students/groups that are at a low level of readiness.
Coaching:
The advisor provides specific instructions and closely supervises task accomplishment, but also explains decisions, solicits suggestions, and supports progress. Use this style with groups that have a few leaders that are at a higher readiness level who will need your support with the rest of the group to get things accomplished.
Supporting:
The advisor facilitates and supports the efforts toward the task accomplishments and shares responsibilities for decision making with the students. Use this style with students/ groups that are just starting to understand the concepts that will lead to success – the group is just starting to "get it."
Delegating:
The advisor empowers the students to conduct their own decision making, problem solving, and delegating. Use this style with students/groups that are at a high level of readiness.

Advising Skills

Flexibility:
You must be able to move from one style to another in order to meet the needs of the different types of students and multiple circumstances you will encounter.
Diagnosis:
You have to learn how to diagnose the needs of the students you advise. Determining what is needed is not always the thing that will get the most positive response – it is what will lead the student through a problem, set the standard for the future, or help to teach the student a valuable life lesson.
Contracting:
You have to learn how to come to some agreements with students. It can be helpful to work together to reach an agreement as to which advising style they seek from you. This is a valuable lesson for assisting students with understanding the rules of engagement and interaction that will be carried forth as they mature.