Cascade Clubs and Programs Office, SC01, (971) 722-5371

 

New Club Orientation

Your First Meeting

You’ve got your first meeting scheduled, congrats!  That can sometimes be tricky.  Now you need to find a meeting space for your club.  PCC has a lot of great facilities for you to hold your club meetings.  Here are your options:

  • A classroom: We recommend you start by seeing if you can book a classroom.  Classrooms are ideal for clubs because they come with Audio/Visual resources, are relatively private and their location is familiar to almost every student. To book a room send an email, with the time, date and club name to carooms@pcc.edu.  You should expect a response within two business days.
  • Library Rooms: The library in the Student Center has large study rooms which can accommodate your club.  They don’t come equipped with Audio/Visual resources, but you can request A/V from the library staff.  To book these rooms check with library.
  • The Resource Room: The Resource Room is located across the hall from the Student Lounge. We recommend that you use the Resource Room only as a last resort.  This is due to the fact that it is not a private meeting area and has no technological resources.  Still, it is better than meeting in the cafeteria or other public area. To book the Resource Room, contact ASPCC's administrative assistant at leadership.ca@pcc.edu

Once you have your first meeting set and a space booked, you should begin writing the agenda for the meeting. For inexperienced club leaders it is a good idea to visit the Clubs and Programs Office and get some guidance on developing your first meeting’s agenda.

While each agenda varies, there are some general parts you should include.

  • An “ice-breaker” is an activity in which members introduce themselves and share an interesting fact about themselves.  For example, the question might be, “Tell us your name, your major, and one of your funniest moments.”  Response, “Hi I’m Bob, I’m majoring in Library Science and once I accidently dropped a pile of books on Tom Hanks’ foot.” You get the idea.
  • Present your constitution to the group and ask for feedback and questions.  Make sure you have enough copies for everyone to read and review it.  Talk about the club’s purpose, its leadership structure and voting method.  When you’re done going over it, ask if anyone has any changes they would like to suggest.  After you have addressed any concerns, ask the group to adopt the constitution.  This is an important step, don’t skip it!
  • Goals and projects are the part of the meeting that members tend to like the most.  This is where you get to outline activities for the upcoming school year.  Goals and projects can be social or political, service or recreational, general or specific.  It’s all up to you and your club; however, the better defined your goals are, the easier they will be to achieve them. Setting goals is an important exercise, because it provides clarity and vision for your group and it helps The Clubs and Programs Office know how to support your club.
First meeting
Outdoor meeting

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