Minutes 3-5-2008

CURRICULUM/GEN ED COMMITTEE
a standing committee of the Education Advisory Committee
Minutes

March 5, 2008

Sylvania CC, Conference Rm B

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Scot Leavitt, Chair

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Pam Kessinger

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Ed DeGrauw

Todd Sanders

Moe O’Connor

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Jim Parks

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Scott Quinn

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Tammy Dowd

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Joe Wright

Nancy Hutt

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Andrea Lowgren

Jim Jeffery

Bob Allen

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Heiko Spoddeck

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Andrew Cohen

Committee Support:

Amy Alday-Murray

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Scott Huff

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Dorothy Badri

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Rick Aman

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Stacey Timmins

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Andrew Roessler

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Steve Smith

Leslie Hackett

Guests:

Katrina Cloud

Rick Willebrand

Spencer Hinkle

James Harrison

Elizabeth Metcalf

Beth Fitzgerald

Kendra Cawley

Information Items from the Curriculum Office:

(These items do not require curriculum committee recommendation)

Experimental Courses:

ART 299 – History of Islamic Art

PS 299 – The 2008 Elections

Inactivations:

None to report

Old Business:

188. EET 111 – Electrical Circuit Analysis I
Course Revision – Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Postponed at SAC Request

189. EET 112 – Electrical Circuit Analysis II
Course Revision – Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Postponed at SAC Request

190. EET 113 – Electrical Circuit Analysis III
Course Revision – Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Postponed at SAC Request

191. EET 188 – Industrial Safety
Course Revision – Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Postponed at SAC Request

192. EET 221 – Semiconductor Devices/Circuits
Course Revision – Title, Requisites, Outcomes
Postponed at SAC Request

193. EET 222 – Operational Amplifier Circuits
Course Revision – Requisites, Outcomes
Postponed at SAC Request

194. EET 223 – RF Communications Circuits
Course Revision – Outcomes
Postponed at SAC Request

195. EET 260 – Biomedical Equipment I
Course Revision – Requisites
Postponed at SAC Request

196. EET 261 – Biomedical Equipment II
Course Revision – Requisites
Postponed at SAC Request

197. EET 280C – BMET Practicum
Course Revision – Description, Requisites
Postponed at SAC Request

210. TE 9145- Electrical Motor Controls (ELT 201)
Course Revision – Number, Description, Outcomes
Recommended with outcomes to read:

  1. Design, analyze, install, and repair alternating current motors, motor starters, and control circuits.
  2. Use industry terminology to explain or discuss motor operations with industry professionals.
  3. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations. *
* required for statewide Apprenticeship degree



218. TE 9201 – AMP ACT I (ELT 250)
Course Revision – Number, Description
Recommended with description to read:

Includes an overview of premises cabling systems, an in-depth review of the ANSI/TIA/EIA and ISO/IEC industry standards, and a discussion and hands-on practicum on the rough-in, installation, management, and termination of shielded and unshielded twisted pair and optical fiber cabling systems. The course is about 85% hands-on and is designed with a systems approach instruction method.  Successful completion of the course examination will certify you as an AMP Registered Installer.

219. TE 9202 – AMP ACT II (ELT 251)
Course Revision – Number, Description, Requisite
Recommended with description to read:

Students will obtain the experience necessary to certify and document twisted pair and optical fiber cable plants based on established industry standards, which include ANSI/TIA/EIA-568A, TSB-67, ANSI/EIA/TIA-526-14A and ANSI/TIA/EIA-526-7. Each student will also obtain experience troubleshooting common problems with installed LAN cable plants. This course is approximately 75% hands-on training.  An extensive documentation package is provided. Successful completion of the course examination will certify you as an AMP Registered Certifier and Troubleshooter.

220. TE 9203 – AMP ACT III (ELT 252)
Course Revision – Number, Description, Requisites
Recommended with description to read:

Designed for individuals involved in the design and installation of premises cabling systems. This course progresses through a step-by-step process from the initial design analysis through the final actual project presentation based on the guidelines of the TIA/EIA/ISO standards. The student design decision rationale regarding network platforms and technologies, cabling architectures, and media selection is discussed in detail. Successful completion of the course examination will certify you as an AMP Registered Designer.

237. TE 9631 – LME Electrical I (APR 101)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Outcomes
Recommended with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the basic principles of electrical theory to discuss, explain, and calculate how electrical current flows in conductors and electrical circuits as applied to subsequent courses and the workplace.
  2. Solve mathematical formulas and equations of theory.*
  3. Calculate voltage drop.*
  4. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations.*
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

238. TE 9632 – LME Electrical II (APR 102)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with description to read:

Covers the principles of magnets, magnetism and electromagnetism; AC/DC generators and the process of generating a voltage; DC motors and alternating current principles, including the components of an AC sine wave/wave-form. Electrical safety, principles of inductance, inductive reactance, capacitance and capacitive reactance, various types of capacitors, capacitor testing and their use in an industrial environment will also be discussed.
Prerequisites: APR 101 and TE 9631

And with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the general theories of magnetism, electromagnetism, and magnetic flux to discuss, explain, and apply the general operating principles of motors, transformers, inductors, capacitors, and generators for both A/C and D/C currents as applied to subsequent courses and the workplace.
  2. Describe and apply basic theory of electrical sources.*
  3. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations.*
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

239. TE 9633 – LME Electrical III (APR 103)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with outcomes to read:

  1. Use electromagnetic theory to discuss, explain, service and repair A/C motors and transformers utilizing test equipment as applied to subsequent courses and the workplace.
  2. Solve electrical equations using trade specific mathematical formulas.*
  3. Draw and interpret industrial blueprints and schematics.*
  4. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations. *
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

240. TE 9634 – LME Electrical IV (APR 104)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with description to read:

Introduces lighting fundamentals and their application in the industrial environment. Also covers fuses, receptacles, wiring methods, blueprints, batteries and some solid state components related to their use.

And with outcomes to read:

  1. Use lighting fundamentals, battery theory, trade-specific math, NEC rules for fuses and receptacles to discuss, explain, install, and repair electrical devices in the workplace.
  2. Operate PLC's according to trade-specific applications and methodology.*
  3. Draw and interpret industrial blueprints and schematics.*
  4. Use test equipment to make electrical measurements.*
  5. Demonstrate appropriate use and care of trade-specific equipment.*
  6. Describe various troubleshooting techniques for trade-specific equipment.*
  7. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations. *
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

241. TE 9610 – Electrical I: 1st Year, 1st Term (APR 121)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Outcomes
Recommended with description to read:

Covers general atomic theory, electron flow in conductors, calculations of Ohms law when determining the values of voltage, current, resistance and power in series, parallel and combination electrical circuits. Covers sizing and the application of conductors and the concept of Voltage Drop in electrical circuits.

And with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the basic principles of electrical theory to discuss, explain and calculate how electrical current flows in conductors and electrical circuits as applied to subsequent courses and the workplace.
  2. Use electrical meters to measure voltage, amperage, and resistance.
  3. Solve mathematical formulas and equations of theory.*
  4. Calculate voltage drop.*
  5. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations.*
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

242. TE 9611 – Electrical II: 1st Year, 2nd Term (APR 122)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with description to read:

Covers the basic principles of alternating current, direct current, and electromagnetism as applied to generators, and alternating current and direct current motors, including the concepts of inductance, inductive reactance, capacitors, capacitive reactance, and their effects upon alternating current circuits.

And with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the basic principles of alternating current, direct current, and electromagnetic theory to discuss, explain, and wire motors, transformers, generators, inductors, capacitors, and storage cells as they apply to subsequent courses and the workplace.
  2. Solve electrical equations using trade-specific mathematical formulas.*
  3. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations.*
  4. Describe various troubleshooting techniques of trade-specific equipment.*
  5. Use test equipment to make electrical measurements.*
  6. Demonstrate appropriate use and care of trade-specific equipment.*
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

243. TE 9612 – Electrical III: 1st Year, 3rd Term (APR 123)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with description to read:

Focuses on alternating current power distribution, transformers, motors, storage cells, solid state semiconductor devices and three phase motor winding connections (Delta and Wye) as they apply to a heavy industrial environment.

And with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the general theories of both alternating current flow and direct current flow in conductors to discuss, explain, and apply the general principles of power distribution, transformers, motors, batteries, and solid state semiconductor devices as applied to subsequent courses and the workplace.
  2. Demonstrate familiarity of industry terminology.*
  3. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations. *
  4. Use test equipment to make electrical measurements.*
  5. Demonstrate appropriate use and care of trade-specific equipment. *
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

244. TE 9613 – Electrical IV: 2nd Year, 1st Term (APR 124)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with outcomes to read:

  1. Use NEC requirements to discuss, explain and wire flexible cords, fixture wires, cut out boxes, and lighting devices with correct bonding and grounding methods as applied to subsequent courses and the workplace.
  2. Solve electrical equations using trade-specific mathematical formulas. *
  3. Draw and interpret industrial blueprints and schematics. *
  4. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations. *
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

245. TE 9614 – Electrical V: 2nd Year, 2nd Term (APR 125)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with description to read:

Covers residential and commercial lighting, fixtures, and ballast in detail. Includes conductor selection, overcurrent protection, motor maintenance, calculations, controls, troubleshooting, services, construction upgrades, wire methods, tagout, lockout and appliances. Covers series, branch, and parallel circuits in detail, and the basic use of a multimeter to check for voltage, current, and resistance.
Prerequisites: APR 124 or TE 9613
And with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the requirements of specific articles of the NEC to discuss, explain, and apply the general principles of ground fault, direct short, and overload protection; fuses and circuit breakers; lighting devices; certain transformers; motors and motor starters; as applied to subsequent courses and the workplace.
  2. Describe various troubleshooting techniques of trade-specific equipment.
  3. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations. *
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

246. TE 9615 – Electrical VI: 2nd Year, 3rd Term (APR 126)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the requirements of specific articles of the NEC to explain, discuss and install emergency power systems, freeze protection and temporary electrical systems as applied to subsequent courses and the workplace.
  2. Navigate the NEC Code book to identify these requirements.
  3. Describe various troubleshooting techniques of trade-specific equipment. *
  4. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations. *
  5. Describe and apply basic theory of electrical sources.*
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

250. TE 9145 – Electrical Motor Controls (APR 201)
Course Revision – Number, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with outcomes to read:

  1. Design, analyze, install, and repair alternating current motors, motor starters, and control circuits.
  2. Use industry terminology to explain or discuss motor operations with industry professionals.
  3. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations. *
    *required by statewide Apprenticeship degree

251. TE 9636 – LME Electrical VI (APR 202)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the National Electric Code requirements for lighting, motors, transformers, panels, wireways, over current protection, and sizing calculations to explain, discuss and wire specific electrical devices. 
  2. Use the NEC articles and tables to perform various calculations.*
  3. Prepare for state exam.*
  4. Complete and pass timed practice exams.*
  5. Complete NEC code preparations exams with 75% or higher.*
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

252. TE 9637 – LME Electrical VII (APR 203)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with description to read:

Provides a working knowledge of the NEC. Topics include installation code requirements for the following: electrical equipment for general use such as motors, luminaries, air conditioners, cords, switchboards and panel boards. Also covers special occupancies which will assist students in locating and understanding electrical code requirements for hazardous locations such as gas stations, spray paint booths, aircraft hangars, health care facilities, places of assembly, theaters, manufactured buildings, mobile homes, temporary locations, etc. Electrical standards will be emphasized.
Prerequisites: APR 202 or TE 9636

And with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the National Electric Code requirements for special occupancies, special equipment, emergency systems, fire alarm systems, communications, and sizing calculations to explain, discuss and wire specific electrical devices as applied to the workplace.
  2. Interpret NEC and Oregon Specialty Codes.*
  3. Demonstrate knowledge of industry terminology.*
  4. Use the NEC articles and tables to perform various calculations.*
  5. Prepare for state exam.*
  6. Complete and pass timed practice exams.*
  7. Complete NEC code preparation exams with a 75% or higher.*
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

253. TE 9638 – LME Electrical VIII (APR 204)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the National Electric Code requirements, the Oregon Administrative Rules, and the Oregon Amendments to the NEC to discuss, explain and apply licensing and electrical installations, such as branch circuits, feeders, over current devices, grounding, and bonding as they apply to the workplace.
  2. Solve mathematical formulas and equations of theory.*
  3. Interpret NEC and Oregon Specialty Codes.*
  4. Use the NEC articles and tables to perform various calculations.*
  5. Utilize the Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR's) in relation to the NEC and Oregon Specialty Codes (OSC). *
  6. Prepare for state exam.*
  7. Complete and pass timed practice exams. *
  8. Complete NEC code preparation exams with a 75% or higher.*
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

254. TE 9616 – Electrical VII: 3rd Year, 1st Term (APR 221)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with outcomes to read:

  1. Calculate voltage, amperage, resistance, power, power factor, conductor size, inductance, inductive and capacitive reactance, and impedance found in the heavy industrial workplace per NEC tables and requirements and as they apply to subsequent courses.
  2. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations. *
  3. Describe and apply basic theory of electrical sources. *
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

255. TE 9617 – Electrical VIII: 3rd Year, 2nd Term (APR 222)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with outcomes to read:

  1. Use specific articles of the NEC to discuss, explain and apply wiring methods, safe installations, sealing requirement, standby power supplies, and machine process control in specialized occupancies such as health care facilities, aircraft hangers, and hazardous locations.
  2. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations. *
    3.   Demonstrate familiarity of industry terminology.*
    *required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

256. TE 9618 – Electrical IX- 3rd Year, 3rd Term (APR 223)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the general principles of electrical control system logic to discuss, explain, and operate motor control circuits: programmable logic control (PLC) circuits, pilot devices, sensors, and timers found in control circuits, process machine control circuits, including troubleshooting of these complex circuits as they apply to the workplace.
  2. Solve electrical equations using trade specific mathematical formulas.*
  3. Operate PLC’s according to trade-specific applications and methodology.*
  4. Demonstrate safe working conditions in accordance with state and federal regulations. *
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

257. TE 9619 – Electrical X: 4th Year, 1st Term (APR 224)

Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with description to read:

Emphasizes the use and understanding of the National Electrical Code. Assists plant maintenance electricians in preparing for the state electrical exam. Topics include grounding, motors, wiring methods, overcurrent protection, branch circuits, calculations, feeders and specialty codes.
Prerequisites: APR 223 or TE 9618

And with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the requirements of the NEC, the Oregon Administrative Rules, and the Oregon Specialty Code, as defined by specific articles in each of these code books to discuss, explain and apply the basic principles of general electrical installations, feeders, branch circuits, services, grounding, bonding, surge arrestors, temporary wiring, and related calculations as they apply to the workplace.
  2. Interpret NEC and Oregon Specialty Codes. *
  3. Demonstrate familiarity of industry terminology. *
  4. Utilize the Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR's) in relation to the NEC and Oregon Specialty Codes (OSC). *
  5. Use the NEC articles and tables to perform various calculations. *
  6. Prepare for the NEC code exam. *
  7. Complete and pass timed practice exams. *
  8. Complete the NEC code preparation exams with a 75% or higher. *
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

258. TE 9620 – Electrical XI: 4th Year, 2nd Term (APR 225)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with description to read:

Emphasizes the use and understanding of the NEC. Topics include cable, raceway, busway, cablebus, switches, panel boards, lighting, heating equipment, transformers, and the taking of practice exams.
Prerequisites: APR 224 or TE 9619

And with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the requirements of the NEC, the Oregon Administrative Rules, and the Oregon Specialty Code, as defined by specific articles in each of these code books to discuss, explain and apply the basic principles of general wireways, portable cords, cables, switches, receptacles, cord connections, plugs, panels, general lighting systems, resistance heating, motors and controls, HVAC/R equipment, generators, transformers, transformer vaults, and related calculations as they apply to the workplace.
  2. Interpret NEC and Oregon Specialty Codes. *
  3. Utilize the Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR's) in relation to the NEC and Oregon Specialty Codes (OSC). *
  4. Use the NEC articles and tables to perform various calculations. *
  5. Prepare for the NEC code exam. *
  6. Complete and pass timed practice exams. *
  7. Complete the NEC code preparation exams with a 75% or higher. *
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

259. TE 9621 – Electrical XII: 4th Year, 3rd Term (APR 226)
Course Revision – Number, Title, Description, Requisites, Outcomes
Recommended with description to read:

Emphasizes the use of understanding of the NEC. Topics includes code articles, OAR's, supplemental code reference materials, calculations and practice exams. Completion of the series prepares the student apprentice to become a licensed Manufacturing Plant Electrician Journeyperson.
Prerequisite APR 225 or TE 9620

And with outcomes to read:

  1. Use the requirements of the NEC, the Oregon Administrative Rules, and the Oregon Specialty Code, as defined by specific articles in each of these code books to discuss, explain and apply the basic principles of hazardous locations, specialized occupancy, specialized locations, emergency systems, photovoltaic systems, and signaling circuits as applied to the workplace.
  2. Interpret NEC and Oregon Specialty Codes. *
  3. Utilize the Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR's) in relation to the NEC and Oregon Specialty Codes (OSC). *
  4. Use the NEC articles and tables to perform various calculations. *
  5. Prepare for the NEC code exam. *
  6. Complete and pass timed practice exams. *
  7. Complete the NEC code preparation exams with a 75% or higher. *
    * required for statewide Apprenticeship degree

263. APR 202 – LME Electrical Code – Level I (was TE 9636)
Contact/Credit Hour Change
Recommended

264. APR 203 – LME: Electrical Code – Level II (was TE 9637)
Contact/Credit Hour Change
Recommended

265. APR 204 – LME: Electrical Code – Level III (was TE 9638)
Contact/Credit Hour Change
Recommended

266. APR 224 – Electrical Code – Level I (was TE 9619)
Contact/Credit Hour Change
Recommended

267. APR 225 – Electrical Code – Level II (was TE 9620)
Contact/Credit Hour Change
Recommended

268. APR 226 – Electrical Code – Level III (was TE 9621)
Contact/Credit Hour Change
Recommended

New Business:

269. INSP 252 – International Building Code 3
Course Revision – Description, Outcomes
Recommended

270. INSP 253 – International Building Code 3
Course Revision – Description, Outcomes
Recommended with description to read:

Introduces the loading parameters for structural engineering in the International Building Code chapters that apply to Small Commercial Structures of three stories and less. Also covers glazing, temporary structures and prefabrication construction. This course is worth 60 HSW credits to AIA members. Prerequisites: RD 115 or WR 115 and placement into MTH 60 or equivalent/higher.

271. BCT 115 – Introduction to Residential Green Roofing
New Course
Recommended with description to read:

Provides a basic understanding of local residential green roof design and installation.  Covers green roof benefits, best practices, material selections, and appropriate plantings; includes hands-on installation.

And with outcomes to read:

  1. Use targeted selling points to articulate green roof benefits to customers, contractors and designers.
  2. Apply basic green roof design concepts that work in the Pacific Northwest climate to a construction project, including selecting a basic palette of local green roof plants.
  3. Design and construct green roofs using appropriate roofing materials, green roof layers and planting selections.

272. HUM 100 – Introduction to Humanities
General Education Request
Recommended

273. HUM 100 – Introduction to Humanities
Diversity Request
Withdrawn at SAC Request

274. ARCH 137 – AutoCAD Architectural Desktop
Course Revision – Title
Recommended with description to read:

Introduction to AutoCAD Architecture, which offers a variety of tools not available in the base AutoCAD drafting package.  It includes a collection of objects representing the most common architectural components such as walls, doors, windows, stairs and roofs.
Prerequisite: ARCH 136 or DRF 136.

275. CJA 245 – Search Warrant Preparation
New Course
Recommend with prerequisites: CJA 100, CJA 111 and WR 121 or instructor permission.

And with outcomes to read:

  1.  Effectively investigate criminal offenses with a focus on gathering critical information for the warrant application process
  2. Draft search and seizure affidavits and judicial orders for a variety of criminal offenses and situations
  3. Organize and utilize information to create key documents in a way that will present the least chance for successful evidentiary challenges during motions to controvert or suppress

276. MM 262 – Video Production III
New Course
Recommend with prerequisites: MM 260 and MM 235, or instructor’s permission.
And with outcomes to read:

  1. Create standard documentary preproduction materials including proposals, treatments, scripts, and budgets.
  2. Get appropriate release forms and copyright clearance.
  3. In a documentary production environment:

 Properly set up and use a video camera and camera support;

 Properly place microphones and record audio;

 Properly set up lights;

 Properly set up a field video monitor.

4.   Edit short documentary projects on a non-linear video editing system.

5.   Use the roles of a production crew appropriately to produce a documentary video.

6.   Conduct and/or assist with interviews

7.   Use various modes of delivery for documentary videos.