Minutes 1-5-2005

CURRICULUM GEN/ED COMMITTEE of the
EDUCATIONAL ADVISORY COUNCIL
MINUTES
January 5, 2005
SYLVANIA CAMPUS, CC BLDG, CONF ROOM B
3:00 - 5:00 pm

Committee Members:

X

Kendra Cawley, Chair

X

Diane Kamali

X

Dieterich Steinmetz

X Adrian Rodriguez

X

Michael Cleghorn

X

Pam Kessinger

X

Doris Werkman

  Jeff Josifek

X

Marlene Eid

X

Michael Marciniak

X

Joe Wright

X Moe O’Connor

Dan Findley

 

 

   

Committee Support:

Amy Alday-Murray

Guy Sievert

X

Susan Wilson

X

Frost Johnson

X

Brett Williams

Guests:

Dominique Millard, Walter Morales, Lynn Geis, Taylor Hanna, Carol Handy, Gary Hecht.

The meeting was called to order at 3:02 p.m. with introductions.

 

OLD BUSINESS .

147. ENL 173 Grammar 1 – Contact/Credit Change

            Lec: 4              Proposed: 2

            Load: .272       Proposed: .136           

            Contact: 4       Proposed: 2

            Credits: 4         Proposed: 2

RECOMMENDED; CCOG Attached

148. ENL 183 Grammar 2 – Contact/Credit Change

            Lec:4               Proposed: 2

            Load: .272       Proposed: .136

            Contact: 4       Proposed: 2

            Credits: 4         Proposed: 2

RECOMMENDED ; CCOG Attached

149. ENL 193 Grammar 3 – New Course

            See Full Request for Details

RECOMMENDED; CCOG Attached

 

NEW BUSINESS

150. SP 100 – Requisite Change

Change prerequisite from None to Placement in WR 121 by ASSET or successful completion of WR 115

RECOMMENDED with deletion of “by ASSET”

151. SP 105 Listening – Requisite Change

Change prerequisite from None to Placement in WR 121 by ASSET or successful completion of WR 115

RECOMMENDED with deletion of “by ASSET”

152. SP 130 Business and Professional Communication – Requisite Change

Change prerequisite from None to Placement in WR 121 by ASSET or successful completion of WR 115

RECOMMENDED with deletion of “by ASSET”

153. SP 140 Introduction to Intercultural Communication – Requisite Change

Change prerequisite from None to Placement in WR 121 by ASSET or successful completion of WR 115

RECOMMENDED with deletion of “by ASSET”

154. SP 214 Interpersonal Communication – Requisite Change

Change prerequisite from None to Placement in WR 121 by ASSET or successful completion of WR 115

RECOMMENDED with deletion of “by ASSET”

155. SP 215 Small Group Communication – Requisite Change

Change prerequisite from None to Placement in WR 121 by ASSET or successful completion of WR 115

RECOMMENDED with deletion of “by ASSET”

156. SP 217 Theories of Persuasion – Requisite Change

Change prerequisite from None to Placement in WR 121 by ASSET or successful completion of WR 115

RECOMMENDED with deletion of “by ASSET”

157. SP 227 Nonverbal Communication – Requisite Change

Change prerequisite from None to Placement in WR 121 by ASSET or successful completion of WR 115

RECOMMENDED with deletion of “by ASSET”

158. SP 229 Oral Interpretation – Requisite Change

Change prerequisite from None to Placement in WR 121 by ASSET or successful completion of WR 115

RECOMMENDED with deletion of “by ASSET”

159. SP 237 Gender Communication – Requisite Change

Change prerequisite from None to Placement in WR 121 by ASSET or successful completion of WR 115

RECOMMENDED with deletion of “by ASSET”

160. MTH 243 Statistics I – Description Change

Modify to read: TI graphing calculator with advanced statistical programs required and/or computer software.

RECOMMENDED

161. MTH 244 Statistics II – Description Change

Modify to read: TI graphing calculator with advanced statistical programs required and/or computer software.

RECOMMENDED

162. CG 280A Cooperative Education: Career Development – Description Change

            Add: May be repeated up to 12 credits.

RECOMMENDED

163. CS 271 Computer Systems II – Course Title, Description, Outcomes Change

            Proposed Title: Computer Architecture

            See full request for Description & Outcomes changes

RECOMMENDED, without designation on Transfer or Diversity Lists

164. CS 171 Computer Systems I – Course Title, Description, Outcomes Change

            Proposed Title: Assembly Language

            See full request for Description & Outcomes changes

RECOMMENDED, without designation on Transfer or Diversity Lists

165. CS 200 Computer Systems I – New Course Request

RECOMMENDED, without designation on Transfer or Diversity Lists

with correction of Load Total to 3.42 , CCOG attached

166. CS 201 Computer Systems II – New Course Request

RECOMMENDED, without designation on Transfer or Diversity Lists

with correction of Load Total to 3.42 , CCOG attached

167. EET 256 Electronics Project Lab – New Course Request

RECOMMENDED with correction of Load Total to 2.76 and contingent upon receipt of CCOG’s

168. EET 242 Microcontroller Systems – New Course Request

RECOMMENDED with correction of Load Total to 3.42 and contingent upon receipt of CCOG’s

169. EET 238 Operational Amplifier Circuits – Course Number & Requisite Change

            Proposed Number: EET 222

            Change Prerequisite from EET 218 to EET 221

RECOMMENDED

170. EET 218 Semiconductor Devices and Circuits – Course Number & Requisite Change

            Proposed Number: EET 221

            Change Prerequisite from EET 131 to EET 221

RECOMMENDED with Change of Prerequisite from EET 131 to EET 113

171. EET 228 RF Communications Circuits – Course Number & Requisite Change

            Proposed Number: EET 223

            Change Prerequisite from EET 218 to EET 221

RECOMMENDED

172. EET 188 Industrial Safety – Requisite Change

            Change Prerequisite from EET111 or EET 176 to EET111 or EET 121

RECOMMENDED

173. EET 179 Digital Systems III– Course Number & Requisite Change

            Proposed Number EET 123

            Change Prerequisite from EET 177 to EET 122

RECOMMENDED

174. EET 177 Digital Fundamentals II– Course Number, Title & Requisite Change

            Proposed Number EET 122

            Proposed Title: Digital Systems II

            Change Prerequisite from EET 176 to EET 121

RECOMMENDED

175. EET 176 Digital Fundamentals I – Course Number and Title Change

            Proposed Number EET 121

            Proposed Title Digital Systems I

RECOMMENDED

176. EET 131 Electrical Circuit Analysis III– Course Number & Requisite Change

            Proposed Number EET 113

            Change Prerequisite from EET 121 to EET 112

RECOMMENDED

177. EET 121 Electrical Circuit Analysis II– Course Number Change

            Proposed number EET 112

RECOMMENDED

178. CST 264 C# Multi-Tier .NET Architecture Software Development – New Course Request

            RECOMMENDED with correction of Load Total to 3.42

 

4 Credit Conversion Committee

There was discussion regarding the 4 credit conversion approval process and posting courses on the web as they are approved by the sub-committee and Curriculum Committee.  It was confirmed that the sub-committee is empowered to make the decision for recommendation.  The web page will be updated when the minutes of the sub-committee are posted.

December 8th meeting included Speech, History, and Anthropology.

The meeting was adjourned at 4:51

CS 200 - Computer Systems I

Date: May 21, 2004
Prepared by: Thomas Niemann

Course Number: CS 200
Course Title: Computer Systems I

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours/Week: 3
Lecture/Lab Hours/Week: 0
Lab Hours/Week: 3
Number of Weeks: 11
Special Fee: none

Course Description For Publication

Introduction to computer systems from a software perspective. Systems programming using C and assembly language. Basic computer organization. Representation of data. Machine instruction sets and assembly programming, relationship between C code and assembly code, C pointers and structures and their machine-level representation. Linking and loading. Program debugging. Recommended: CS 162 or CS 234u.

Addendum To Description

Students will complete several lab/programming exercises techniques. This course is transferable to a four year institution and is applicable toward an Associate of Science or Associate of Applied Science Degree.

Intended Outcomes for the Course

On completion of this course students should be able to:

  • Software Engineering Process
    • Follow the software development process (requirements analysis, design, implementation, and test) in the development of small programs.
    • Employ good software engineering practices such as incremental development, encapsulation, data integrity checking, and adherence to style guidelines.
    • Create appropriate user interfaces for simple programs.
    • Identify and use standard design patterns where appropriate.
  • Computer Science Theory
    • Understand the relationship between a high-level language and machine code.
    • Be able to interpret assembly language on a mixed listing.
  • Technology and Tools
    • Use appropriate tools to compile and debug programs.
  • Communication
    • Identify and comprehend technical documentation.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Students will demonstrate, on exams or lab assignments, the following:

  • An understanding of internal data representation and manipulation.
  • An ability to understand machine-level representation of programs.
  • An understanding of linking, loading, and relocation.

Course Content

Concepts:

  • representing and manipulating information
    • information storage
    • integer representation
    • integer arithmetic
    • floating point
  • machine-level representation of programs
    • arithmetic and logical operations
    • control
    • procedures, stacks, arguments
    • array allocation and access
    • alignment
      • linking and loading
        • static linking
        • object files
        • relocatable object files
        • symbol tables
        • executable object files
        • loading executable object files
        • dynamic linking with shared libraries
CS 201 - Computer Systems II

Date: May 21, 2004
Prepared by: Thomas Niemann

Course Number: CS 201
Course Title: Computer Systems II

Credit Hours: 4
Lecture Hours/Week: 3
Lecture/Lab Hours/Week: 0
Lab Hours/Week: 3
Number of Weeks: 11
Special Fee: none

Course Description For Publication

Further introduction to computer systems from a software perspective. Basic operating systems concepts and calls. Defining, measuring and improving program performance. The memory hierarchy: storage technologies, caches, virtual memory, memory allocation techniques. Recommended: CS 200.

Addendum To Description

Students will complete several lab/programming exercises techniques. This course is transferable to a four year institution and is applicable toward an Associate of Science or Associate of Applied Science Degree.

Intended Outcomes for the Course

On completion of this course students should be able to:

  • Software Engineering Process
    • Follow the software development process (requirements analysis, design, implementation, and test) in the development of small programs.
    • Employ good software engineering practices such as incremental development, encapsulation, data integrity checking, and adherence to style guidelines.
    • Create appropriate user interfaces for simple programs.
    • Identify and use standard design patterns where appropriate.
  • Computer Science Theory
    • Understand exceptions and interrupts.
    • Understand and use system calls.
    • Be able to measure performance and execution time.
    • Understand storage technologies and memory hierarchy.
  • Technology and Tools
    • Effectively use software development tools including libraries, compilers, editors, linkers and debuggers.
  • Communication
    • Identify and comprehend technical documentation.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Students will demonstrate, on exams or lab assignments, the following:

  • An understanding of exceptions and interrupts.
  • An understanding of system calls.
  • The issues involved in measuring performance and program execution time.
  • Storage technology and memory hierarchies.
  • Memory allocation.

Course Content

  • exceptions and interrupts
  • processes and process control
  • file I/O
  • system calls
  • measuring program execution time
  • improving program performance
  • memory hierarchy
  • storage technology
  • caches
  • virtual memory
  • memory allocation

 

Date: October 1, 2004

Course Number: ENL 173

Course Title: Grammar 1

Credit Hours: 2

Lecture Hours per Week: 2

Lecture/Lab Hours per Week: 0

Lab Hours per Week (excludes coop, practicum, or clinical): 0

Number of Weeks: 11/12

Special Fees: None

Course Description for Publication:

This elective class includes the identification and practice of the following grammatical structures: subject-verb agreement; question and negation structure, verb tenses, sentence patterns, and sentence types. It is designed to reinforce concepts in both oral and written contexts. Prerequisites: placement in ENL 150 levels or above. Does not replace courses in the core curriculum.

Intended Outcome(s) for the Course:

Identify grammatical structures listed under section A and use them appropriately in a variety of oral and written contexts.

Outcome Assessment Strategies:

Videotape analysis, assignments, quizzes, tests, and oral presentations.

Course Content: Themes, concepts, issues

A.        Grammar Review and Instruction

            1. Subject-verb agreement

            2. Question/Negation formation

            3. Simple and Progressive Verb Tenses

            4. Sentence patterns

            5. Simple, Compound, and Complex Sentences

B.        Critical Thinking Skills

Competencies and Skills

A.        Grammar

            Verbs and Related Structures

  1. Use subject-verb agreement structures competently
  2. Use question/negation structures competently
  3. Use simple and progressive verb tenses competently
  4. Use sentence patterns competently
  5. Use simple, compound, and complex sentences competently

B.        Critical Thinking Skills

  1. Use supplemental materials to practice grammatical structures in a variety of oral and written contexts.
  2. Demonstrate an awareness of audience and purpose for various registers and settings.
  3. Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information, eg. contracted verb forms in spoken English
  4. Determine appropriate uses for various structures, eg. deciding when to use a simple tense instead of a continuous tense.
  5. learn to look at language in context in order to determine function and purpose

 

Date: October 1, 2004

Course Number: ENL 183

Course Title: Grammar 2

Credit Hours: 2

Lecture Hours per Week: 2

Lecture/Lab Hours per Week: 0

Lab Hours per Week (excludes coop, practicum, or clinical): 0

Number of Weeks: 11/12

Special Fees: None

Course Description for Publication:

This elective class includes the identification and practice of the following grammatical structures: subject-verb agreement: verb tenses, passive voice, gerunds and infinitives, and articles. It is designed to reinforce concepts in both oral and written contexts. Prerequisites: placement in ENL 160 levels or above. Does not replace courses in the core curriculum.

Intended Outcome(s) for the Course:

Identify grammatical structures listed under section A and use them appropriately in a variety of oral and written contexts.

Outcome Assessment Strategies:

Videotape analysis, assignments, quizzes, tests, and oral presentations.

Course Content: Themes, concepts, issues

A.        Grammar Review and Instruction

  1. Perfect and Perfect Progressive Verb Tenses
  2. Active/Passive Voice
  3. Gerunds and Infinitives
  4. Articles

B.        Critical Thinking Skills

Competencies and Skills

A.        Grammar

            Verbs and Related Structures

  1. Use perfect and perfect progressive verb tenses competently
  2. Use active/passive voice competently
  3. Use gerunds and infinitives competently
  4. Use articles competently

B.        Critical Thinking Skills

  1.  Use supplemental materials to practice grammatical structures in a variety of oral and written contexts.
  2. Demonstrate an awareness of audience and purpose for various registers and settings.
  3. Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information, eg. choosing between a gerund and infinitive form
  4. Determine appropriate uses for various structures, eg. choosing an active or passive voice
  5. learn to look at language in context in order to determine function and purpose

 

Date: October 1, 2004

Course Number: ENL 193

Course Title: Grammar 3

Credit Hours: 2

Lecture Hours per Week: 2

Lecture/Lab Hours per Week: 0

Lab Hours per Week (excludes coop, practicum, or clinical): 0

Number of Weeks: 11/12

Special Fees: None

Course Description for Publication:

This elective class includes the identification and practice of the following grammatical structures: modals, conditionals, clause and phrase reductions, parallel structures, and reported speech. It is designed to reinforce concepts in both oral and written contexts. Prerequisites: placement in ENL 250 levels or above. Does not replace courses in the core curriculum.

Intended Outcome(s) for the Course:

Identify grammatical structures listed under section A and use them appropriately in a variety of oral and written contexts.

Outcome Assessment Strategies:

Videotape analysis, assignments, quizzes, tests, and oral presentations.

Course Content: Themes, concepts, issues

A.        Grammar Review and Instruction

  1. Modals
  2. Conditionals
  3. Clause and phrase reductions
  4. Parallel structures
  5. Reported speech.

B.        Critical Thinking Skills

Competencies and Skills

A.        Grammar

            Verbs and Related Structures

  1. Use modals effectively
  2. Use conditionals effectively
  3. Use clause and phrase reductions effectively
  4. Use parallel structures effectively
  5. Use reported speech effectively

B.        Critical Thinking Skills

  1.  Use supplemental materials to practice grammatical structures in a variety of oral and written contexts.
  2. Demonstrate an awareness of audience and purpose for various registers and settings.
  3. Distinguish between relevant and irrelevant information, eg. choice of modals
  4. Determine appropriate uses for various structures, eg. choosing between quoted and reported speech
  5. learn to look at language in context in order to determine function and purpose.