ITP - Sign Language Interpretation Outcomes

AAS: Sign Language Interpretation
Upon completion of the Sign Language Interpretation Program AAS Degree, students will be able to:
1. Serve as ASL/English interpreter in a variety of professional settings, drawing on experience
with and knowledge of different settings within the Deaf community, and interact effectively and
respectfully with members of the majority and minority language groups.
2. Build on the foundation of knowledge of the interpreting process, cultural differences, and
Deaf culture, through feedback and critical self-reflection, and continually improve as an
interpreter while deepening familiarity with and understanding of Deaf culture.
3. Continue education towards a 4-year degree and gather sufficient professional experience to
earn national interpreter certification through the Registry for Interpreters of the Deaf (RID). 6.2.10

Two-Year Certificate: Sign Language Interpretation
Upon completion of the Sign Language Interpretation Program Two-Year Certificate, students will be able to:
1. Serve as ASL/English interpreter in a variety of professional settings, drawing on experience
with and knowledge of different settings within the Deaf community, and interact effectively and
respectfully with members of the majority and minority language groups.
2. Build on the foundation of knowledge of the interpreting process, cultural differences, and
Deaf culture, through feedback and critical self-reflection, and continually improve as an
interpreter while deepening familiarity with and understanding of Deaf culture.
3. Work as a member of a team of interpreters to maintain skills and stay current with the
interpreting field. 6.2.10

One-Year Certificate: Sign Language Interpretation - Deaf Studies

Upon completion of the Sign Language Interpretation Program Deaf Studies Certificate, students will be able to:

1. Communicate effectively and respectfully using American Sign Language in a variety of settings in the
Deaf community, including in a professional capacity.
2. Serve as liaison between Deaf and hearing communities in settings both formal and informal,
continually learning more about and advocating for the needs of the Deaf community.
3. Use feedback from others to continually improve ASL proficiency. 6.2.10

 


References