PCC/ CCOG / WR

Course Content and Outcome Guide for WR 121H

Course Number:
WR 121H
Course Title:
English Composition: Honors
Credit Hours:
4
Lecture Hours:
40
Lecture/Lab Hours:
0
Lab Hours:
0
Special Fee:
 

Course Description

This is the Honors version. Focuses on academic writing as a means of inquiry. Uses critical reading, discussion and the writing process to explore ideas, develop cultural awareness and formulate positions. Emphasizes development of a variety of strategies to present evidence in support of a thesis.25 GPA and placement into WR 121, or completion of WR 115 and RD 115. Prerequisites: 3. Audit available.

Addendum to Course Description

Students will be able to work through multiple drafts of several pieces of writing with time to separate the acts of writing and revising. In addition, students will be able to read, reread, reflect, respond to, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of texts.
Upon completion of Writing 121 with a C or better, students will be able to work through multiple drafts of several pieces of writing with time to separate the acts of writing and revising. In addition, students will be able to read, reread, reflect, respond to, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of texts.

Intended Outcomes for the course

Upon completion of WR121 with a €œC€ or higher, students will be able to:
1. Read closely to determine a writer€™s purpose and perspective.
2. Formulate questions to explore the way that a variety of texts communicate meaning.
3. Write for a variety of clearly defined purposes, audiences and contexts.
4. Write clear and coherent essays that demonstrate a logical development of ideas and incorporate evidence in support of a thesis
5. Begin to locate, evaluate and use information effectively and ethically to develop an informed position and encourage intellectual curiosity.
Additional Honors Outcomes:
Enhances the experience of the traditional WR121 course by enabling students to:
•Use critical thought to recognize explicit and implicit assumptions in written materials; articulate connections and relationships among course materials
•Employ leadership skills to organize and problemsolve in group settings
•Apply principles of meta-cognition to visual, written, and/or oral sources

Course Activities and Design

  • Students read, reread, reflect, respond to, interpret, analyze, and evaluate a variety of texts. Students compose several essays using a variety of strategies to present evidence in support of a thesis.
  • The instructor guides students€™ writing development via written feedback and individual conferences.
  • Class presentations on independent projects provide the course with additional source material.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Reading and writing assessment tasks will include the following€”
* At least one essay with sustained development (1,500-2,000 words) which explores multiple facets of a controlling idea and reaches a significant conclusion. One paper must include outside research with properly documented and integrated sources.
* Two out-of-class conferences.
Reading and writing assessment tasks may include the following€”
* Instructor and peer evaluation.
* Presentations by individuals and groups.
* Peer analysis.
* Self-analysis.
* Examinations and Quizzes.
* In-class essays.
* Evaluation of small- and full-group discussion.
Portfolio of course writings and essays.
Attendance policies vary with instructors: Students missing a week's worth of classes may not expect an A; those missing two weeks' worth may not pass the course.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

* Implicit/explicit thesis
* Audience
* Paragraphing
* Evidence/support
* Concrete detail
* Writing as a process
* Peer review
* Generating ideas/topic selection
* Diction/tone/voice
* Proper grammar usage
* Writing modes
* Writing as a method of inquiry
* Personal/reflective essay
* Thesis statement/topic sentences
* Critical reading of a variety of texts
* Proper documentation; use and methods of research; evaluating and incorporating sources; selection, editing, placement and analysis of quotations
* Use of rhetorical strategies, persuasion, logic, and reasoning; awareness of audience
Competencies and Skills
* Understanding distinct conventions of various writing situations and modes of writing
*Awareness of writing as a process
*Identifying a writer€™s stated or implied central and secondary ideas
*Summarizing and paraphrasing ideas presented in a text other than one€™s own
*Developing and organizing a text by using details, examples, data, metaphor
*Critically analyzing reading for assumptions, purposes, style, logic, and general use or misuse of rhetorical and argumentative forms
*Developing skills in observation, description, analysis, research, and/or the creative process for use in writing
*Editing texts for appropriate grammar
*Documenting using MLA; awareness of other citation styles
*Using writing as a method of inquiry
*Articulating an understanding of the works of other writers within a given historical, cultural, or social context
*Speaking and listening reflectively
*Applying appropriate techniques for exploring assumptions and expressing viewpoints
*Measuring a writer€™s viewpoint against personal experiences and the experiences of others
*Understanding self as part of a larger community
*Appreciating and reflecting on new ideas in a spirit of open interaction
*Appraising own writing skills and abilities, and those of others through revision process
*Revising written work from peer or instructor feedback to achieve clarity, coherence, and effectiveness
*Seeking knowledge and acquiring skills toward achieving academic, career, and personal goals
*Researching independently and incorporating of outside sources within student writing.
*Classroom leadership
*Meta-cognition
*Independent inquiry
*Interdisciplinary integration