PCC/ CCOG / VT

Course Content and Outcome Guide for VT 211 Effective Winter 2016

Course Number:
VT 211
Course Title:
Pharmaceutical Mathematics II
Credit Hours:
1
Lecture Hours:
0
Lecture/Lab Hours:
20
Lab Hours:
0
Special Fee:
$6.00

Course Description

Continues mathematics as applied to pharmacology from Pharmaceutical Mathematics I. Reviews drug dosage calculations and solutions and percentages, then introduces more challenging problems. Includes fluid therapy and cancer chemotherapy problems and solutions. Prerequisites: Admission to Veterinary Technology program.

Addendum to Course Description

The purpose of this course is to review and further teach the veterinary technology student the fundamentals of pharmaceutical mathematics. This is designed for first year veterinary technology students and is a graduation requirement for the Associates Degree in Applied Sciences in Veterinary Technology. Credits in this course are not transferable to a four year school towards a baccalaureate degree. No text is required for this course.

Intended Outcomes for the course

Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  • Calculate the IV flow rate and perform dosage calculations after the addition of a therapeutic drug to fluids.
  • Calculate the amount and rate of therapeutic drugs given in mg/kg/hr and relate this value to the medical condition of the patient.
  • Discuss the types of fluids and additives given in emergency situations.
  • Understand the basic use of cancer chemotherapy drugs in veterinary practice.
  • Convert weight to body surface area and apply it to chemotherapy dosage problems.
  • Calculate dosages of cancer chemotherapy agents based on the label factor method (dimensional analysis).

Course Activities and Design

The topics covered include unit conversions, solutions and percentage calculations, allegation, drug dosage calculations, cancer chemotherapy calculations, basic fluid therapy and advanced fluid therapy.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Grading will be based upon student understanding of the course content as demonstrated by periodic examinations, homework assignments, quizzes, a comprehensive final exam and attendance. To be eligible for a passing grade, the student must have attended a minimum of 80 percent of each of the lecture and lab classes

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

1.0 DOSAGE CALCULATIONS AND CONVERSIONS INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL: The goal is for the student to develop a proficient working knowledge of calculating drug dosages and converting between units of the metric, apothecaries and household systems using the label factor method (dimensional analysis).

OBJECTIVES:

1.1 Review basic math as it applies to the metric system.

1.2 Define the following units and abbreviations:

a. gram Gm or g

b. milligram mg

c. microgram ug

d. kilogram kg

e. liter L

f. milliliter ml or cc

g. minim m

h. grain gr

i. pound lb

j. dram dr

k. ounce oz

l. pint pt

m. quart qt

n. drop gt

o. teaspoon tsp

p. tablespoon tbsp

q. units u r. milliequivalent meq

1.3 Know the approximate equivalents:

a. 65 milligrams= 1 grain

b. 1 gram=1000 miligrams= 15 grains

c. 15 grams= 4 drams= 1 tablespoon= 3 teaspoons= 15 milliliters

d. 30 grams= 1 ounce= 2 tablespoons = 30 milliliters

e. 16 ounces= 1 pound=454 grams

f. 1 kilogram= 1000 grams= 2.2 pounds

g. 1 milliliter= 15 minims= 15 drops

h. 1 quart= 946 milliliters

i. 1 pint= 473 milliliters

j. 1 milligram= 1000 micrograms

1.4 Define and perform the steps in applying the label factor method to conversion between metric, apothecaries and household systems.

1.5 Be able to convert between Celsius and Fahrenheit temperature.

1.6 Be able to calculate drug dosages in dry or liquid measure based on body weight.

2.0 FORMS AND EQUIPMENT USED IN DOSAGE MEASUREMENT INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL: The goal is for the student to develop a proficient working knowledge of drug forms and equipment used in drug measurement.

OBJECTIVES:

2.1 Define the following terms

a. Tablet

b. Capsule

c. Elixir

d. Suspensions

e. Solutions

2.2 Describe the following methods and equipment used in medicating animals by oral and parenteral administration.

a. Calibrated dropper

b. Dose syringe c. 3cc-60cc syringe (luer slip and lock tip) and needles d

. Tuberculin syringe

e. Insulin syringes (regular and lo-dose)

f. Multidose syringe

g. Pre-filled syringe

3.0 DRUG LABELS

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL: The goal is for the student to become proficient at reading drug labels.

OBJECTIVES:

3.1 Describe the following parts of a drug label

a. Generic name

b. Brand name

c. Name of manufacturer

d. Total volume of container

e. Administration route

f. Dosage strength g. dosage form

h. Supply dosage

i. Directions for mixing

j. Expiration date

4.0 SOLUTIONS AND PERCENTAGE

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL: The goal is for the student to develop a proficient working knowledge of calculating percentages of solutions for diluting and mixing purposes.

OBJECTIVES:

4.1 Define and calculate the percentage of solutions, the volume of concentrate or the volume of diluent using the formula method.

4.2 Define each of the following terms as they relate to percentage solutions.

a. Percent weight in volume (w/v)

b. Percent weight in weight (w/w)

c. Percent volume in volume (v/v)

d. one part per million (1ppm)

e. 100% solution concentration (mg/ml)

4.3 Be able to perform percentage calculations by alligation alternate(Pearson square) and alligation medial methods.

5.0 FLUID THERAPY I

NSTRUCTIONAL GOAL: The goal is for the student to develop a proficient working knowledge of basic use of fluids in veterinary practice as well as calculate the amount and rate of fluid administration. The student will learn to add drugs to fluids and perform revelent mathematical calculations in regard to them.

OBJECTIVES:

5.1 List the indications for administering fluid therapy.

5.2 Define and understand the advantages and disadvantages of each of the following routes of fluid administration.

a. Oral

b. Intravenous

c. Subcutaneous

d. Intraperitoneal

e. Intraosseous

5.3 Define and list the reasons the following fluids may be used.

a. Lactated Ringer€™s solution

b. Ringer€™s solution

c. Dextrose 5% in water

d. Normal Saline

e. Half strength saline

f. 50% dextrose

5.4 Define and calculate the amount of fluid needed to rehydrate, maintain and replace ongoing losses in a dehydrated animal.

5.5 List and understand the use of the following equipment a. Standard drip IV set b. Pediatric drip IV set c. Buretrol IV set

5.6 Calculate the IV flow rate when the total infusion time or infusion rate is specified using the formula method.

5.7 Calculate the IV flow rate and perform dosage calculations after the addition of a drug to fluids.

5.8 Calculate the amount of drug given in mg/kg/hr. Relate this value to the medical situation of the animal.

5.9 Discuss fluid therepy in emergency situations; discuss and calculate potassium and sodium bicarbonate therepy. Discuss the types of fluids and additives given in emergency situations

5.10 Discuss metabolic acidosis and calculate dosages of treatment modalities.

6.0 CANCER CHEMOTHERAPY

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL: The goal is for the student to develop a proficient working knowledge of basic use of cancer chemotherapy drugs in veterinary practice as well as calculate the amount to give The student will learn to convert weight to body surface area and apply it to dosage problems.

OBJECTIVES:

6.1 List the precautions of cancer chemotherapy drug use.

6.2 List the major side effects of cancer chemotherapy agents.

6.3 Interpret weather or not a cancer chemotherapy agent might be caustic or not from the label.

6.4 Be able to convert weight to body surface area.

6.5 Calculate dosages of cancer chemotherapy agents based on the labelfactor method (dimensional analysis).