PCC/ CCOG / VT

Course Content and Outcome Guide for VT 203

Course Number:
VT 203
Course Title:
Veterinary Procedures Seminar
Credit Hours:
3
Lecture Hours:
0
Lecture/Lab Hours:
60
Lab Hours:
0
Special Fee:
$18.00

Course Description

Covers the special skill areas of technician training, such as electrocardiography, bandaging, and various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Students investigate, research and report (both orally and in writing) on topics of special interest. Prerequisites: VT 202.

Addendum to Course Description

This is the third term of a sequence of three consecutive courses which will be taught fall, winter, and spring terms of the second year.  This course covers numerous practical aspects of surgical and medical nursing, such as first aid, toxicology, supportive care, electrocardiography, diagnostic and treatment procedures, euthanasia and necropsy techniques, and semen and vaginal cytology assessment.

This is designed for second year veterinary technology students and is a graduation requirement for the Associates Degree in Applied Sciences in Veterinary Technology.  Credits in this course are not transferable to a four year school towards a baccalaureate degree.

There is no specific text required for this course, any specific reading assignments will come from the basic textbook ordered for VT 101.

Intended Outcomes for the course

Upon successful completion of the course, the short term outcome will be that the student will have satisfactorily accomplished the goals and objectives of this course content guide and confirmed as provided in the assessment above.  The long term outcome desired is for the student to gain sufficient skills and knowledge of special veterinary procedures to successfully pass the National Veterinary Technician Board Examination and effectively utilize the knowledge gained in their Cooperative Education Experience and as a practicing veterinary technician upon graduation.  The course content guides are developed by college-wide subject area faculty and approved by the administration.  

Laboratory tasks with an asterisk indicate tasks the student must be able to perform since they are listed as Aessential tasks@, and tasks with two asterisks indicated tasks listed as Arecommended tasks@ by the Accreditation Policies and Procedures of the Committee on Veterinary Technician Education and Activities of the American Veterinary Medical Association.  Tasks with no asterisks are considered neither Aessential@ nor Arecommended@, but are taught based on instructor, SACC, and/or advisory committee recommendations.  This course content and outcome guide specifies which tasks students are required to perform (as indicated in the task description) and the tasks on which they have been educated and have observed but individual performance is not required.

1.0  FIRST AID

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:  
The goal is for the student to develop the knowledge and skills to become proficient at first aid techniques.

2.0  FLUID THERAPY AND HYPERALIMENTATION

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:  
The goal is for the student to develop an understanding of the indications for fluid therapy and hyperalimentation, the methods of administration, and the monitoring of the patient's hydration.  

3.0  BANDAGING AND SPLINTS

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:  
The goal is for the student to develop the skills necessary to construct and apply the common splints and bandages.

4.0  ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHY

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:  
The goal is for the student to develop a basic knowledge in the use of the diagnostic and monitoring electrocardiograph, and be able to recognize certain dangerous abnormal rhythms, and calculate EKG indices.  A guest lecturer will provide 3 hours of instruction.  

5.0  SMALL ANIMAL DIAGNOSTIC AND TREATMENT PROCEDURES

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL: 
The goal is for the student to develop a basic knowledge of certain diagnostic techniques used in veterinary medicine.

6.0  EUTHANASIA

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:  
The goal is for the student to develop a knowledge of the drugs used in euthanasia, and an understanding of the psychological aspects for the patient and owners.

7.0  REPRODUCTIVE CYTOLOGY  

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:  
The goal is for the student to develop the knowledge and skills to obtain cytological samples from animals to properly prepare them for examination.  

8.0  SPECIAL AREAS OF INTEREST IN VETERINARY MEDICINE

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:  
The student will develop a basic knowledge of the following areas of special veterinary fields of interest.  Guest speakers will present these topics.

9.0  LABORATORY COMPETENCIES

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:  
The student should demonstrate the ability to perform adequately the necessary tasks required of a veterinary technician.

10.0  Oral Presentation and Term Paper

INSTRUCTIONAL GOAL:  
The student will learn to do research utilizing available resources, such as the PCC library, their textbooks, and veterinary Web sites.  The student will also be required to make an oral presentation and utilize methods of visual presentations to enhance the speech.

Course Activities and Design

This course is designed to be a lecture- laboratory course.  It is a three-credit-hour course that meets for six-lecture-laboratory hours per week.

Lecture will cover first aid, fluid therapy, alimentation, electrocardiography, cross-matching of blood, euthanasia and necropsy techniques, and vaginal cytology.  Numerous guest lecturers will be utilized to speak on their areas of specialty, such as electrocardiography, neurology, avian procedures, semen evaluation and vaginal cytology, and exotic animal procedures.

Students will be required to write a term paper and present a 15 minute oral presentation in which they have to speak for a minimum of 10 minutes and thus 5 minutes can also include a movie or video presentation.  Visual aids are strongly encouraged and points are awarded for them.  They can be no longer than 30 minutes in length.  

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Grades will be based on the student's understanding of the course content as demonstrated by periodic examinations, the term paper and oral presentation, a comprehensive final examination, and by attendance.  To receive a passing grade, the student must have attended a minimum of 80 percent of each of the lecture and lab classes.