PCC/ CCOG / MUS

Course Content and Outcome Guide for MUS 111C

Course Number:
MUS 111C
Course Title:
Music Theory I: Sight Singing and Ear Training (part one)
Credit Hours:
1
Lecture Hours:
0
Lecture/Lab Hours:
20
Lab Hours:
0
Special Fee:
$6.00

Course Description

Focuses on the development of skills related to the notation, performance and aural recognition of music. Includes meter, rhythm, diatonic melodies, triads, solfeggio, intervals, and harmonic function. Part one of three term sequence. Corequisites: MUS 111. Audit available.

Addendum to Course Description

This course is a requirement for students wishing to major in music. Students will be required to use MIDI lab outside of class time to develop and reinforce skills.

Intended Outcomes for the course

Material will primarily be presented in a lecture/lab format. Other educational methods will be used to enhance lectures. These will include use of recorded materials, internet sites and computer software.
A large amount of student to teacher contact should be achieved throughout the term in order to encourage and accomplish successful student development.
Students will be able to interpret and perform rhythmic notation in simple meters (beat division and longer).
Students will be able to interpret and perform rhythmic notation in compound meters (beat division and longer).
Students will be able to isolate and accurately notate rhythm of a musical example (beat division and longer).
Students will be able to apply solfege to conjunct diatonic melodies.
Students will be able to aurally identify scale degrees within major and minor scales.
Students will be able to sing diatonic intervals (m2-P5) at sight.
Students will be able to aurally identify diatonic harmonic intervals (m2-P5).
Students will be able to sing basic conjunct diatonic melodies at sight using solfege.
Students will be able to accurately notate diatonic conjunct melodies.
Students will be able to aurally identify major and minor scales.
Students will be able to aurally identify diatonic chord functions (primary functions in major and minor keys).
Students will be able to aurally detect errors (rhythm and pitch) in the notation of diatonic conjunct melodies.
Students will be able to aurally identify triad chord qualities (major and minor).
Students will be able to aurally identify nonharmonic tones within a musical example (passing and neighbor tones).
 

Outcome Assessment Strategies


The instructor should make the criteria for assigning a course grade and for evaluating student progress clear at the beginning of the term. The individual instructor will determine the methods of assessment. Assessment methods may include:

Aural examinations
Singing examinations
Homework assignments
Class participation

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)


Rhythmic Notation

Beat values and longer duration
Simple meter
Compound meter
Half-beat values
Error detection

Solfege 

Moveable DO vs. fixed DO
The major scale
The natural minor scale

Diatonic Intervals

Ascending intervals
Descending intervals
Using familiar tunes to recognize melodic intervals

Harmony

Major triads (root position)
Minor triads (root position)
Primary triad identification (tonic and dominant)
Cadence identification (authentic and plagal cadences)

Melody

Conjunct major melodies
Conjunct minor melodies
Reference tones within major melodies
Identifying nonharmonic tones
Error detection

COMPETENCIES/SKILLS
The following skills are expected to be achieved to successfully meet the minimum requirement ("C" or "Pass") of the course.

  • Accurately perform rhythmic examples at sight. 
  • Sight sing harmonic diatonic intervals (m2-P5). 
  • Sight sing diatonic conjunct melodies using solfege. 
  • Aurally identify the meter of a musical example.      
  • Aurally identify harmonic intervals (m2-P5) 
  • Isolate and notate the rhythm of a musical example.      
  • Aurally identify scale types (major and minor). 
  • Aurally identify triad chord qualities (major and minor). 
  • Aurally identify notational errors in conjunct diatonic melodies. 
  • Aurally identify nonharmonic tones (passing and neighbor tones). 
  • Aurally identify harmonic cadences. 
  • Aurally identify individual scale degrees within major and minor scales. 
  • Notate diatonic conjunct melodies upon hearing.