PCC/ CCOG / ITP

Course Content and Outcome Guide for ITP 261

Course Number:
ITP 261
Course Title:
Interpreting Theory II
Credit Hours:
3
Lecture Hours:
30
Lecture/Lab Hours:
0
Lab Hours:
0
Special Fee:
 

Course Description

Explores the role and functions of interpreters in K-12 classroom. Includes roles and responsibilities of interpreters and other members of the educational team, professionalism, expectations of K-12 interpreters, characteristics of deaf learners, theories of language acquisition, legislation, and technology.

Addendum to Course Description


Intended Outcomes for the course

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

Use an understanding of the administration of educational services for deaf children in K-12 settings, including administrative responsibilities, position descriptions, contracts, policies, and evaluations to effectively advocate for themselves as employees in that setting.
Work effectively as a member of the educational team in order to determine when and what issues should be referred.
Use knowledge of etiology of hearing loss in children, co-occurring disabilities, and current research regarding deaf children and cognition to determine appropriate strategies to meet students€™ needs.
Integrate an understanding of differences in expectations of interpreters and student€™s abilities when working with primary, middle and high school students in order to work effectively with each age group.
Follow best practices in behavior management
Integrate knowledge of laws that impact the education of deaf and hearing children, the provision of interpreting services, and their effect on interpreters in the workplace.
Act in accordance with the ethical and professional standards of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Code of Professional Conduct, and the Educational Interpreter Proficiency Assessment Guidelines for Professional Conduct for Educational Interpreters, applying the Demand Control Schema to analysis and decision making.
Apply theories of language acquisition in hearing children and factors which limit deaf children€™s language acquisition to interpreting decisions in K-12 settings.

Course Activities and Design

Activities will include lectures, readings, discussions, ethical & logistical problem-solving, group or individual projects, guest lecturers and panel discussions. 

Outcome Assessment Strategies


Evaluation will be based on group/individual projects, student presentations, papers and exams or quizzes.

 

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

 

Roles and responsibilities:

• other professionals, interpreter

• IEPs

• consumer advocacy and education

 

Characteristics of deaf learners:

* etiology of hearing loss

• co-occurring disabilities

• language delay

 

Expectations of K-12 interpreters:

• behavior management

• other duties

• as related to age/experience of child

 

Legislation

• laws impacting deaf education

*No Child Left Behind

• mandatory reporting

 

Technology

• Audiology: audiogram and hearing aids

• Cochlear implants

• FM systems

 

Professionalism

• Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Code of Professional Conduct

• EIPA Guidelines for Educational Interpreters

• Demand Control Schema

• professional boundaries

• professional communication

 

Language Acquisition

• language v. communication

• language acquisition v. second language learning

• theories of language acquisition

• phases of language acquisition in hearing and deaf children

• current research on language acquisition in deaf and hearing children

 

 

Related Instruction

Communication
Hours: 45

Outcomes:

-Use an understanding of the administration of educational services for deaf children in K-12 settings, including administrative responsibilities, position descriptions, contracts, policies, and evaluations to effectively advocate for themselves as employees in that setting.
-Work effectively as a member of the educational team in order to determine when and what issues should be referred.
 

 

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to synthesize and apply knowledge and skills developed inthis and prior coursework
  • Describe the administration of educational interpreting services in K-12 settings, including administrative responsibilities, position descriptions, contracts, policies, and evaluations.
  • Demonstrate the ability to analyze difficult situations which have to do with interpreters in the K-12 setting, and to propose solutions
  • Describe what is expected of an interpreter working with primary, middle-school and high school level students.
  • Describe the additional activities, e.g. field trips or assemblies, which an interpreter may be expected to take on
  • Describe the interpreter's role as part of an educational team.
  • Describe appropriate language use as related to story reading, textbook language, and use of fingerspelling and/or "invented" signs
  • Demonstrate an awareness of how the RID Code of Ethics is applied with children as compared to adults.
  • Demonstrate the ability to teach children and adults appropriate use of interpreting services. 12.2008

This course covers the following topics:

  • Issues in the administration of educational interpreting services
  • Specific issues which are pertinent to interpreting at various educational levels, including primary, middle-school, high-school, and post-secondary education.
  • Language development in hearing and Deaf children
  • Expectations of interpreters at various educational levels, including primary, middle-school, high-school, and post-secondary education.
  • The interpreter as part of the educational team
  • Other members of the educational team
  • How to work with classroom mainstream teachers and/or teachers of the Deaf
  • The role of the interpreter in the IEP process (both development and implementation) 12.2008

Human Relations
Hours: 45

Outcomes:

-Use an understanding of the administration of educational services for deaf children in K-12 settings, including administrative responsibilities, position descriptions, contracts, policies, and evaluations to effectively advocate for themselves as employees in that setting.
-Work effectively as a member of the educational team in order to determine when and what issues should be referred.
-Integrate an understanding of differences in expectations of interpreters and student€™s abilities when working with primary, middle and high school students in order to work effectively with each age group.
-Follow best practices in behavior management
-Act in accordance with the ethical and professional standards of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Code of Professional Conduct, and the Educational Interpreter Proficiency Assessment Guidelines for Professional Conduct for Educational Interpreters, applying the Demand Control Schema to analysis and decision making.
 

 

 

Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to synthesize and apply knowledge and skills developed inthis and prior coursework
  • Describe the administration of educational interpreting services in K-12 settings, including administrative responsibilities, position descriptions, contracts, policies, and evaluations.
  • Demonstrate the ability to analyze difficult situations which have to do with interpreters in the K-12 setting, and to propose solutions
  • Describe what is expected of an interpreter working with primary, middle-school and high school level students.
  • Describe the additional activities, e.g. field trips or assemblies, which an interpreter may be expected to take on
  • Describe the interpreter's role as part of an educational team.
  • Describe appropriate language use as related to story reading, textbook language, and use of fingerspelling and/or "invented" signs
  • Demonstrate an awareness of how the RID Code of Ethics is applied with children as compared to adults.
  • Demonstrate the ability to teach children and adults appropriate use of interpreting services. 12.2008

This course covers the following topics:

  • Issues in the administration of educational interpreting services
  • Specific issues which are pertinent to interpreting at various educational levels, including primary, middle-school, high-school, and post-secondary education.
  • Language development in hearing and Deaf children
  • Expectations of interpreters at various educational levels, including primary, middle-school, high-school, and post-secondary education.
  • The interpreter as part of the educational team
  • Other members of the educational team
  • How to work with classroom mainstream teachers and/or teachers of the Deaf
  • The role of the interpreter in the IEP process (both development and implementation) 12.200