PCC/ CCOG / ITP

Course Content and Outcome Guide for ITP 260

Course Number:
ITP 260
Course Title:
Interpreting Theory I
Credit Hours:
3
Lecture Hours:
30
Lecture/Lab Hours:
0
Lab Hours:
0
Special Fee:
 

Course Description

Introduces the profession of sign language interpretation, the role and function of an interpreter, the National Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Code of Ethics, professionalism, the history of the profession, and the basic theories and practices of interpretation. Admission into Sign Language Interpretation Program or department permission required.

Intended Outcomes for the course

Upon completion of this course", students will be able to:

Explain the process by which an occupation comes to be regarded as a profession

Outline the history of sign language interpreting as a profession in the United States

Relate the history of sign language interpreting as a profession in the United States to the professionalization process

Determine appropriate placement of an interpreter within given physical surroundings

Determine preparation needed for a specific interpreting assignment and describe ways to obtain the needed information

Recognize terminology used in the interpreting profession and use it correctly

Describe the various role metaphors which interpreters use to describe their work, their place in the history of the profession, and appropriate uses of each

Describe the impact of cultural differences on an interpretation 

Apply the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Code of Ethics to given situations

Explain the appropriate use of interpreters to an inexperienced consumer

Communicate with consumers in a professional manner

Course Activities and Design

Activities include readings. lectures, discussions, small group problem-solving tasks, role playing, and student presentations.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Student presentations, homework assignments, and written examinations or quizzes.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)


This course introduces students to the professional aspect of interpreting, and covers the following topics:

  • The professionalization process as it relates to interpreters
  • History of interpreting and the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf
  • Terminology used by interpreters to talk about their work
  • Logistics of interpreting, including physical factors such as placement and lighting
  • Interpreting techniques, including processing time issues, dealing with questions, speaker identification, clarification & correction, self-care, and team interpreting
  • Techniques for preparing to interpret, including preparation for content, determining language preference, and self-awareness
  • The impact of differences between Deaf and hearing cultures on interpreting; cultural adjustment
  • The various metaphors which interpreters have used to describe their role: Helper, Conduit, Communication Facilitator, Bilingual Bicultural Mediator, Ally.
  • The Codes of Ethics of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf and of the National Association of the Deaf, and the values underlying each
  • Decision-making strategies and application of the Codes of Ethics
  • Techniques for communicating in a professional manner with consumers of interpreting services.

 

Related Instruction

Human Relations
Hours: 45

 

Outcomes:

Determine preparation needed for a specific interpreting assignment and describe ways to obtain the needed information
Describe the various role metaphors which interpreters use to describe their work, their place in the history of the profession, and appropriate uses of each
Apply the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf Code of Ethics to given situations
Explain the appropriate use of interpreters to an inexperienced consumer
Communicate with consumers in a professional manner

 

Activities:

This course introduces students to the professional aspect of interpreting", and covers the following topics:
History of interpreting and the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf
Terminology used by interpreters to talk about their work
Logistics of interpreting, including physical factors such as placement and lighting
Interpreting techniques, including processing time issues, dealing with questions, speaker identification, clarification & correction, self-care, and team interpreting
Techniques for preparing to interpret, including preparation for content, determining language preference, and self-awareness
The impact of differences between Deaf and hearing cultures on interpreting; cultural adjustment
The various metaphors which interpreters have used to describe their Mediator, Ally.
The Codes of Ethics of the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf and of the National Association of the Deaf, and the values underlying each
Decision-making strategies and application of the Codes of Ethics
Techniques for communicating in a professional manner with consumers of interpreting services.

Upon completion of this course", students will be able to: