Portland Community College | Portland, Oregon

Course Number:
ITP 231
Course Title:
American Sign Language Linguistics II
Credit Hours:
3
Lecture Hours:
30
Lecture/Lab Hours:
0
Lab Hours:
0
Special Fee:
 

Course Description

Analyzes and explores additional phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, variation and historical change of ASL. Explores the discourse structure of ASL. Prerequisites: ITP 230 and admission into the Sign Language Interpretation Program and instructor permission.

Intended Outcomes for the course

Upon completion of this course students should be able to:

  • Discuss and explain the parallels between structural features of language, particularly English and American Sign Language, for the purpose of defining and demonstrating that ASL is a language.
  • Analyze and explain linguistic terms such as: phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and discourse, bilingualism and language contact, mouth morphemes in ASL, registers, variations, and language as art.
  • Develop linguistic competence with ASL from an analytical-theoretical perspective.
  • Analyze and explain how the structure of ASL is built and how it functions in language usage.
  • Develop language observation skills based on theoretical linguistics.
  • Complete a research project including data collection, analysis, and written report.

Course Activities and Design

Activities include readings, lectures, analyzing videos, research project on semantics, discussion, small group problem-solving tasks, and hands-on activities.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Students will be assessed by homework assignments, research project, written examinations or/and quizzes.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

This course introduces students to the study of ASL from a linguistics point of view, and covers the following topics:

  • Terminology used by linguists when discussing ASL
  • Research and publications by various linguists in the field of ASL linguistics
  • The impact of the research and publications in recognizing ASL as a language
  • Collect research data by interviewing several people, analyzing the data, and writing a paper on the research findings
  • Phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, discourse, language use, and facial grammar (e.g. NMS and mouth morphemes) in ASL will be discussed and analyzed in depth to see how the language is formed
  • Language in use, register, and variation will be analyzed and discussed using videotapes

Related Instruction

Computation
Hours: 15

  • Analyze and explain the linguistic terms such as: phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics,and discourse, bilingualism and language contact, mouth morphemes in ASL, registers, variations, and language as art
  • Complete a research project including data collection, analysis, and written report.

Students will:

  • Quantify collected data for their research project to determine the percentage of people who use a select word vs those who do not. 
  • Develop the data spreadsheet and computing the percent of utterances that the interviewees use to document the data they collect. 
  • Employ the use of numbers and fractions to show percent of utterances.

Communication
Hours: 30

  • Discuss and explain the parallels between structural features of language, particularly, English and American Sign Language.
  • Analyze and explain linguistic terms such as: phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and discourse, bilingualism and language contact, mouth morphemes in ASL, registers, variations, and language as art.
  • Analyze and explain how the structure of ASL is built and how it functions in language usage.

  • Use terminology used by linguists when discussing ASL.
  • Collect research data by interviewing several people, analyzing the data, and write a paper on the research findings.
  • Phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, discourse, language use, and facial grammar (e.g.NMS and mouth morphemes) in ASL will be discussed and analyzed in depth to see how the language is formed.
  • Language in use, register, and variation seen in videos will be analyzed and discussed.

Human Relations
Hours: 5

  • Discuss and explain the parallels between structural features of language, particularly, English and American Sign Language, for purpose of defining and demonstrating that ASL is a language.
  • Complete a research project including data collection, analysis, and written report.

  • Collect research data by interviewing culturally Deaf research participants.
  • Develop culturally appropriate behavior such as eye contact and the use of a visual language.
  • Development of professional skills when interacting with the Deaf community members.