Course Content and Outcome Guide for HST 102 Effective Fall 2015

Course Number:
HST 102
Course Title:
History of Western Civilization: Medieval to Modern
Credit Hours:
Lecture Hours:
Lecture/Lab Hours:
Lab Hours:
Special Fee:

Course Description

Covers the High Middle Ages and early modern Europe, including the Renaissance, Reformation, Scientific Revolution, Enlightenment and the French Revolution. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

Intended Outcomes for the course

Upon successful completion students should be able to:

  • Articulate and interpret an understanding of key historical facts and events in late medieval and early modern Europe.
  • Identify the influence of culturally based practices, values, and beliefs to analyze how historically defined meanings of difference affect human behavior.
  • Identify and investigate historical theses, evaluate information and its sources, and use appropriate reasoning to construct evidence-based arguments on historical issues.
  • Construct a well organized historical argument using effective, appropriate, and accurate language.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

Assess by using any combination of the following:

  • Exams
  • Essays
  • Oral Presentations
  • Research projects
  • Service-Learning projects
  • Class participation and discussion
  • Other creative assignments

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

Competencies and Skills:

  • Analyze and evaluate primary and secondary sources
  • Identify a historian's thesis and supporting evidence
  • Develop your own interpretation, using evidence to support it
  • Think critically about the relationships between past and present events and issues
  • Compare and contrast the experience of diverse groups in late medieval and early modern Europe
  • Demonstrate college-level communication skills

Themes, Concepts, Issues:

  • High and Late Medieval Culture:
    • Growth of towns and commerce
    • The Crusades
    • Growth of national monarchies
    • Rise of universities
    • Scholasticism
    • Arts and letters
  • Crises of the Late Middle Ages:
    • Black Death
    • Hundred Years€™ War
    • Babylonian Captivity and Great Schism
  • Renaissance
  • Commercial Revolution
  • Overseas Expansion and Colonization
  • Protestant and Catholic Reformations
  • Religious Wars
  • Absolutism
  • Scientific Revolution
  • Enlightenment
  • French Revolution

Considering such factors as:

  • Geography
  • Social hierarchy
  • Political, legal, and economic structures
  • Cultural contributions
  • Philosophies and religions