PCC/ CCOG / EM

Course Content and Outcome Guide for EM 103

Course Number:
EM 103
Course Title:
Information Systems of Emergency Management
Credit Hours:
3
Lecture Hours:
20
Lecture/Lab Hours:
20
Lab Hours:
0
Special Fee:
$6.00

Course Description

Introduces communications technologies used in emergency response and disaster response, including telephone, radio and computer systems. Covers the operation and components of two-way radio and broadcasting procedures. Explores the link communications specialists provide between agencies, responders and the public. Examines current standards and practices utilizing social media, GIS and GPS, mapping technology, video monitoring and other technologies and security systems. Prerequisites: WR 115, RD 115 and MTH 20 or equivalent placement test scores. Audit available.

Addendum to Course Description

Use of two-way UHF radio and HAM radio and various social media applications are presented in the classroom.
 

Intended Outcomes for the course

  • €‹ Operate two-way radios in compliance with established policies and procedures.
  • Comply with all FCC rules and regulations governing emergency radio broadcasting.
  • Identify applications and understand the use of social media notifications in emergency management.
  • Apply an understanding of GIS and other location and mapping technologies in disaster response and recovery.
  • Use the organizational principles of the Incident Command System to facilitate communications.
  • Identify and provide inputs to decision support and disaster model software and interpret outputs.

Course Activities and Design

  • Examination of radio equipment and demonstration of proper use and maintenance

  • Role-playing of various emergency communications scenarios

  • Scripted scenarios involving various radio broadcasting functions

  • Proper documentation of all radio transmissions

  • Exercises involving control of air time and radio discipline

  • Lecture by a radio technician on trouble shooting and explaining common radio problems.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

  • Written quizzes and exams

  • Documentation of radio transmissions

  • Written and verbal feedback on transmissions and message content

  • Evaluate voice tone", level, clarity, control and verbiage based upon industry standards

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

  • Create and present scenarios based upon a specific formula.  Scenarios will be presented both in written form, using computers  and verbally using radios.
  • Apply accepted policies and procedures for prioritizing incidents, based upon time frame and urgency.
  • Utilize standard formats and verbiage in conveying vehicle and suspect descriptions.
  • Practice all aspects of the communications cycle: Message, Medium, Sender, Receiver and Feedback, to ensure clarity and understanding in all communications.
  • Apply commonly accepted techniques in controlling and directing

Related Instruction

Computation
Hours: 5

Outcomes:

  • Interpret and comply with all FCC rules and regulations governing emergency radio broadcasting.
  • Operate two-way radios in compliance with established policies and procedures.
  • Apply the proper use and maintenance of two-way radio equipment.
  • Apply an understanding of GIS and other location and mapping technologies in disaster response and recovery.

Activities:

Content (Activities, Skills, Concepts, etc.): provide details or specifics
Students will:

  •   Learn processes for numerically defining police, fire, medical and other radio users.
  • Based upon standard operating procedures, track time, in order to monitor activity and check status of field units. A unit is defined as equipment and personnel.
  • Use approximation and ranges in describing physical characteristics of persons, vehicles and objects.
  • Understand the assignment, location, range and strength of radio frequencies and the assignment of frequencies and channels to various groups.
  • Using two-way radios, transmit and receive information, making correct channel selection and documenting identification of radio transmissions and users.
  • Convert all times to military (24 hour) time format, both verbally and in written documentation

Communication
Hours: 40

  • Operate two-way radios in compliance with established policies and procedures.
  • Interpret and comply with all FCC rules and regulations governing emergency radio broadcasting
  • Identify and understand the use of social media notifications in emergency management.
  • Apply the organizational principles of the Incident Command System.
  • Identify and provide inputs to decision support and disaster model software and interpret outputs.

  • Create and present scenarios based upon a specific formula. Scenarios will be presented both in written form and verbally, using radio equipment.
  • Apply accepted policies and procedures for prioritizing calls, based upon time frame and urgency.
  • Utilize standard formats and verbiage in conveying vehicle and suspect descriptions.
  • Practice all aspects of the communications cycle: Message, Medium, Sender, Receiver and Feedback, to ensure clarity and understanding in all communications.
  • Apply commonly accepted techniques in controlling and directing communications.
  • Guest speakers will be utilized to present in areas of specialized communications, such as, Life Flight, Search and Rescue, Public Transportation, and Public Information (Media).

Human Relations
Hours: 8

Outcomes:

  • Identify applications and understand the use of social media notifications in emergency management.

  • Apply the organizational principles of the Incident Command System
  • Operate two-way radios in compliance with established policies and procedures.
     

Activities:

Content (Activities, Skills, Concepts, etc.): provide details or specifics
Students will:

  • Work in small groups, as a team, on a weekly basis, developing increasingly complex scenarios based upon lecture material.
  • Discuss the various roles of responders from the three primary emergency services disciplines: Police, Fire and EMS.
  • Role-play to develop skills and employ standard techniques in dealing with angry, frustrated, upset, frightened or emotional callers in traumatic situations.
  • Demonstrate problem-solving skills based upon written procedures and mutual cooperation.
  • Provide critique/feedback to other students, in a productive, positive learning environment.
  • Practice cooperative responses and teamwork to promote positive call outcomes.
  • Discuss the variety of callers requesting services, including: non-English speakers, mentally ill, impaired, children and elderly, and other vulnerable populations and their special needs.
  • Trouble shooting resources to assist all callers.