PCC/ CCOG / BI

Course Content and Outcome Guide for BI 241

Course Number:
BI 241
Course Title:
Pathophysiology
Credit Hours:
3
Lecture Hours:
30
Lecture/Lab Hours:
0
Lab Hours:
0
Special Fee:
 

Course Description

Lecture/discussion presentation of alterations in homeostasis, alterations in cellular function; and diseases of the immune, muscular, skeletal, integumentary, nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, endocrine, urinary, and reproductive systems. Prerequisites: BI 231 and 232. BI 233 is either a prerequisite or may be taken concurrently. Audit available.

Addendum to Course Description

To clarify the teaching of evolution and its place in the classroom, the Portland Community College Biology Departments stand by the following statements about what is science and how the theory of evolution is the major organizing theory in the discipline of the biological sciences.

  1. Science is a fundamentally non-dogmatic and self-correcting investigatory process. In science, a theory is neither guess, dogma, nor myth. The theories developed through scientific investigation are not decided in advance, but can be and often are, modified and revised through observation and experimentation.
  2. The theory of evolution meets the criteria of a scientific theory. In contrast, creation "science" is neither self-examining nor investigatory. Creation "science" is not considered a legitimate science, but a form of religious advocacy. This position is established by legal precedence (Webster v. New Lenox School district #122, 917 F. 2d 1004).

Biology instructors of Portland Community College will teach the theory of evolution not as absolute truth but as the most widely accepted scientific theory on the diversity of life. We, the Biology Subject Area Curriculum Committee at Portland Community College, therefore stand with such organizations as the National Association of Biology Teachers in opposing the inclusion of pseudo-sciences in our science curricula.

Intended Outcomes for the course

After completing one quarter of pathophysiology, students should have learned the basic content and skills that will enable them to:

  1. Transfer to or complete clinical and academic programs in the allied health sciences, and function competently in these clinical programs.
  2. Effectively communicate case studies in pathophysiology through verbal, written and multimedia means.
  3. Apply the scientific method when evaluating the validity of information related to pathophysiology.
  4. Apply concepts learned during homework and lecture experiences toward successful clinical problem-solving.
  5. Read, understand, and critically evaluate medical journals, health articles, and other forms of data related to pathophysiology.
  6. Understand the basis for some laboratory tests and other diagnostic procedures.
  7. Make correlations between pathophysiology and clinical skills they are learning in their allied health science programs.
  8. Understand how the various organ systems are interrelated, and use this understanding to promote a holistic approach towards the evaluation and treatment of patients.

Course Activities and Design

This course will be taught in a traditional lecture format. Lecture will be presented utilizing a variety of multimedia and interactive presentations.

Outcome Assessment Strategies

At the beginning of the course, the instructor will explain the methods used to evaluate student progress and the criteria for assigning a course grade. Instructors are encouraged to include a variety of techniques, including: examinations, quizzes, poster and/or oral presentations, interpretation of case studies, homework assignments, research papers, portfolios and small group exercises.

Course Content (Themes, Concepts, Issues and Skills)

COURSE CONTENT:
  1. THEMES
    1. Professionalism
    2. Interdependence of health care professions\
    3. Limitations of personal skill levels and knowledge
    4. Critical thinking 
  2. CONCEPTS
    1. Homeostasis
    2. Interelationship between form and function
    3. Scientific method 
  3. ISSUES
    1. Conflicting and limitations of data
    2. Use of animal testing
    3. Differences between science and pseudo-science
    4. Influences between habits and personal health
    5. Preventive medicine

COMPETENCIES AND SKILLS:

  1. Interpretation of data
  2. Proper usage and pronunciation of terms
  3. Positive group interactions
  4. Locating and accessing information
  5. Study skills

EXPECTED STUDENT COMPETENCIES:
Lecture/discussion presentation of alterations in homeostasis, alteration in cellular function, alterations in immune and inflammatory response, alterations in movement and support, alterations in neural control and integration, alterations in respiration and tissue oxygenation, alterations in gastrointestinal function, endocrine function, metabolism and nutrition, alterations in fluid balance, excretion, and reproduction.

Prerequisites: BI231 and 232. BI 233 is a prerequisite/corequisite.

  1. ALTERATIONS IN HOMEOSTASIS
    1. Objective: to develop an understanding of core pathophysiologic processes and adaptation to stress.
  2. ALTERATIONS IN CELLULAR FUNCTION, GENETICS, AND DEVELOPMENT 
    1. Objective: to develop an understanding of cell injury, aging, and death; genetic and developmental disorders, and neoplasia.
  3. ALTERATIONS IN IMMUNE AND INFLAMMATORY RESPONSE 
    1. Objective: to develop an understanding of infectious processes, inflammation and immunity, alterations in immune function, malignancies of white cells, and HIV-related disorders.
  4. ALTERATIONS IN MOVEMENT AND SUPPORT 
    1. Objective: to develop an understanding of musculoskeletal trauma, infection, and diseases. Rheumatic disorders will be emphasized. To develop an understanding of diseases of the integument, including burns.
  5. ALTERATIONS IN NEURAL CONTROL AND INTEGRATION 
    1. Objective: to develop an understanding of acute and chronic disorders of neurologic function, alterations in special sensory function, and pain.
  6. ALTERATIONS IN RESPIRATION AND TISSUE OXYGENATION 
    1. Objective: to develop an understanding of alterations in oxygen transport; alterations in hemostasis and blood coagulation; alterations in blood flow; alterations in blood pressure; alterations in cardiac function (including heart failure and dysrhythmias), and shock; alterations in gas exchange; obstructive disorders; and restrictive disorders.
  7. ALTERATIONS IN GASTROINTESTINAL FUNCTION, ENDOCRINE FUNCTION, METABOLISM AND NUTRITION 
    1. Objective: to develop an understanding of gastrointestinal disorders including the GI tract, gall bladder, pancreas, and liver; as well as an understanding of endocrine disorders and alterations in metabolism and nutrition.
  8. ALTERATIONS IN FLUID BALANCE, EXCRETION, AND REPRODUCTION
    1. Objective: to develop an understanding of fluid and electrolyte disorders, acid-base disorders, renal disease, bladder disorders, genital disorders, and reproductive disorders.