Copyright for Students

Authorized Copyright Agent: Chris Chairsell, Vice President, Academic and Student Affairs | copyright@pcc.edu

Chris Chairsell

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Below are some common, and not-so-common, questions the PCC Copyright Committee have received from students. Don't see an answer to your question here? Don't hesitate to ask!

I have a paper due tomorrow and misplaced the citation of a short quote I need to use. Can I still use the quotation?

Answer: You may be able to use the quote under certain conditions. The Fair Use exception to copyright law may allow use without payment or permission of the copyright owner for research, scholarship, parody, news reporting, or criticism especially in a non-profit educational institution. Each situation must be evaluated separately for the purpose of the use, the nature of the work to be used, the amount to be used, and the effect the use may have on the market or potential market value of the material. Visit the Fair Use page to learn more. If you still have questions, contact Lynda Noland for more information about evaluating your use.

How do I cite material from a website?

Answer: This depends on which citation style you are using for your paper. If you don't know which style, you are using, ask your instructor. Find out more about citing sources at Cite Sources published by PCC Library

Can I quote from an article in EBSCOhost without getting permission

Answer: Yes, if you are an enrolled student at PCC, you can. The library has purchased a license for just such use.

Can my PCC club borrow a video from the library and show it in the CC building during an ASPCC event?

Answer: Your club would need to use a video that has public performance rights. If you have further questions, contact a librarian at PCC library.

What is plagiarism and why does it matter when my paper is only for my English class? It's not like I'm going put it on the web.

Answer: Plagiarism is using someone else's "intellectual property" without giving them credit for having created it. Intellectual property includes many different kinds of things such as published or unpublished books, music, plays, articles, computer programs, novels. Anything with even a small amount of creative expression is copyrighted from the moment it is written, recorded, saved to a computer, "fixed in a tangible medium" including your emails and the papers you write for class.

Can my PCC club have t-shirts made that would have "Portland Community College" and our program name printed on them? They will not be sold and are for personal use only.

Answer: Thank you for asking this question. It is not really a copyright issue. It involves trademark. Contact Russell Banks in the PCC Marketing Department about this one. You must have permission to use "PCC" or "Portland Community College" and must have your final design approved.